CreatorsPublishersAdvertisers
View more in
Environment

Nicholas slams Gulf Coast with dangerous flooding: Latest forecast

ABC News
ABC News
 2021-09-16

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=4CJIm4_0buT0ntx00

Nicholas is stalling over the Gulf Coast, dropping dangerous amounts of rain over areas still recovering from previous storms.

Flash flood watches are in effect through Friday in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=4boe3e_0buT0ntx00
Devon Ravine/Imagn via USA Today Network - PHOTO: People use ponchos to stay dry as thei walk along the Okaloosa Island Fishing Pier on Sept. 15, 2021 in Ft. Walton, Fla. Heavy rains from Tropical Depression Nicholas continues as Tropical Storm Nicholas makes its way across Texas and Louisiana.

Ten to 11 inches of rain has already inundated Alabama and Mississippi with more rain on the way.

MORE: ABC News chief meteorologist Ginger Zee explains how hurricanes form

The heaviest rain over the next 48 hours will be from Mississippi to Alabama to Florida where some areas could see another 6 inches.

New Orleans will continue to see showers and a few thunderstorms with another 1 to 2 inches of rain possible.

MORE: Communities in Louisiana and beyond rally to support Hurricane Ida victims

Slow-moving Nicholas is an especially dangerous threat for Louisiana, which is still recovering from deadly Hurricane Ida and other devastating storms in 2021 and 2020.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=0WwKVo_0buT0ntx00
Gerald Herbert/AP - PHOTO: Storm clouds from Tropical Storm Nicholas are seen behind homes in the Native American community of Isle de Jean Charles, La., which were destroyed by Hurricane Ida, Sept. 14, 2021.

As of Tuesday, about 87,000 customers in Louisiana were still without power from Hurricane Ida, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said.

Over 1,000 Louisiana residents remain at shelters in the wake of Ida, he said Tuesday.

MORE: Above-average Atlantic hurricane season predicted

The governor requested an emergency federal declaration, which was granted by President Joe Biden.

Before heading to Louisiana, Nicholas first struck the Houston area with over 6 inches of rain, shuttering schools.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=2UBDEy_0buT0ntx00
Brandon Bell/Getty Images - PHOTO: Debris and damaged road construction are left after Tropical Storm Nicholas moved through the area, Sept. 14, 2021 in Houston.
https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=2KP6FY_0buT0ntx00
Andrew Dubya via Reuters - PHOTO: A gas station roof is blown away by Tropical Storm Nicholas in Matagorda, Texas, Sept. 13, 2021.

In the Houston area, 460,000 customers were without power at the height of the storm early Tuesday, according to CenterPoint Energy. About 300,000 customers saw their power return by Tuesday evening.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=0Nc7po_0buT0ntx00
Jon Shapley/Houston Chronicle via AP - PHOTO: Jaime Ybarra and Frank Rivera, right, watch the wind and waves as Tropical Storm Nicholas heads toward the Texas coast, Sept. 13, 2021, along the seawall in Galveston, Texas.

Comments / 5

Comments / 0