View more in
Moraga, CA

Where and when to watch the Lamorinda lunar eclipse

Posted by 
Built in the Bay
Built in the Bay
 27 days ago

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=3JsrGb_0a6BsehL00
(David McNew / Getty Images)

(LAMORINDA, Calif.) Lamorinda will be lucky enough to get not only a unique supermoon but a lunar eclipse next week.

Western states are lucky enough to be the prime location for next Wednesday's total lunar eclipse, which is expected in the pre-dawn hours next week. May's supermoon, or flower moon as it's called, will appear bigger and brighter than the previous two this year.

Patch reports that the full four hour and twelve minute lunar eclipse will start at 1:40 a.m. Wednesday with the partial eclipse starting at 2:44 a.m. NASA indicated that the peak would be about 14 minutes from about 4:11 a.m. to 4:25 a.m.

The space agency also predicated that another partial lunar eclipse will happen November 19 of this year with an expected duration of about three and a half hours.

According to NASA, the two kinds of lunar eclipses occur when the Sun and Moon are on opposite sides of the Earth, which is called a total lunar eclipse. A partial lunar eclipse occurs when only part of Earth's shadow covers the Moon.

At points during a lunar eclipse the Moon can appear reddish, as shown in the picture above, because the only light illuminating it comes from light reflected off of Earth's atmosphere. The red light is then reflected onto the moon's surface, making it appear red from Earth. If an observer were to view the Earth during a total lunar eclipse, they would see all Earth's sunrises and sunsets at once.

Wednesday's lunar eclipse is not only a supermoon, it's also a blood moon due to the full lunar eclipse. A blood moon occurs when the Earth is positioned directly between the Moon and the Sun.

A natural question may be, why wouldn't lunar eclipses occur more often like twice a month when the Moon moves through the Earth's shadow. This is because the Moon's orbit of Earth is titled, relative to the Earth's orbit of the Sun.

Regardless of where you'll be viewing next Wednesday's lunar eclipse be sure to take appropriate safety precautions to protect your eyes during viewing.

View All 2 Commentsarrow_down