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Type Investigations

Introducing the 2022 Ida B. Wells Fellows

New York, New York, June 6, 2022 — Type Investigations is pleased to announce the 2022 Ida B. Wells Fellows. This year’s fellows will report on a range of issues, including domestic homicide prevention, migrant rescue practices, homelessness in the Bay Area, and the impact of agricultural policies on Black farmers.
NEW YORK CITY, NY
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When the Heat Is Unbearable but There’s Nowhere to Go

Late last June, farmers in Walla Walla, Washington, noticed something odd happening to their onions. Walla Walla, an oasis in the middle of the state’s high desert, is bursting with vineyards, wheat fields and acres of the city’s eponymous sweet onions. As temperatures climbed above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, then above 110 degrees, the oversized onions began to burn, pale blisters forming underneath their papery skins. When the temperature reached 116, the onions started cooking, their flesh dissolving into mush.
WALLA WALLA, WA
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How a Major Tar Sands Pipeline Project Threatens Indigenous Land Rights

Near the banks of the North Thompson River in British Columbia, about 400 miles northeast of Vancouver, the Tiny House Warriors village announces itself with a hand-painted sign attached to wooden stakes: “Unceded Secwepemc Territory.” The area is quiet and remote, with tall stands of spruce and cedar forming part of the world’s largest inland temperate rainforest. At the entrance to the village, a pile of logs creates a makeshift barricade. Beyond it, a cluster of five small wood-framed homes sit on trailers, their walls decorated with colorful murals depicting elements of the Secwepemc people’s history and culture.
VANCOUVER, CA
Type Investigations

You Probably Aren’t Getting Paid Overtime. Here’s Why.

After decades of decline in overtime pay, the Biden administration is considering action to sharply expand access in a time of high inflation. This is the third article of a four-part series examining the 40-year effort by big business and elected officials to deny Americans extra pay for extra work.

Can Biden Sharply Expand Overtime Pay?

After decades of decline in overtime pay, the Biden administration is considering action to sharply expand access in a time of high inflation. This is the second article of a four-part series examining the 40-year effort by big business and elected officials to deny Americans extra pay for extra work.
POTUS

Overworked and Underpaid

After decades of decline in overtime pay, the Biden administration is considering action to sharply expand access in a time of high inflation. This is the first article of a four-part series examining the 40-year effort by big business and elected officials to deny Americans extra pay for extra work.
U.S. POLITICS

The Backstory: Sarah Posner

Type Investigations reporting fellow Sarah Posner has spent the past several years reporting on the increasing influence of the evangelical Christian right on mainstream politics. In her newest piece, “Overturning Roe Is the Crowning Achievement of Christian Nationalism,” produced in partnership with The Nation, Posner looks at Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s leaked draft opinion for Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization and analyzes how the decision will serve the Christian right in their attacks against not just reproductive rights, but other rights as well.
CONGRESS & COURTS

The Backstory: Akintunde Ahmad

In this episode of The Backstory, we're speaking to Ida B. Wells fellow Akintunde Ahmad about his article, “What Happened When Oakland Tried To Make Police Pay for Misconduct,” produced in partnership with The Appeal. In his investigation, Akintunde looks back at a program from two decades ago that required the Oakland Police Department to pay some of its own legal costs and how the city failed to enact the change it promised.
OAKLAND, CA

What Happened When Oakland Tried to Make Police Pay for Misconduct

On Dec. 3, 1993, Rashidah Grinage’s family of six was reduced to four. Her 21-year-old son, Luke, had gotten engaged that morning, and had recently interviewed for a new job. But when police arrived at her Oakland, California, home seeking to impound Luke’s dog, a gun fight broke out. Luke and his father, Raphael, a double amputee who used a wheelchair, were killed, along with an officer. It wasn’t until five years later that Grinage became aware of an audio cassette tape recorded by one of the officers, revealing that police had failed to follow protocol around de-escalation and resorted to force within minutes of encountering Luke.
OAKLAND, CA

Must-Read Investigations of 2021

These stories take time and resources — if you’d like to help, click here to support our End-of-Year Fundraising Drive. For a limited time your donation will be doubled!. This year we produced dozens of stories, reaching millions of people through our collaborations with partners in digital, audio, print, and film. Much of our coverage examined the ongoing fallout of the pandemic, the climate crisis, and last summer’s uprisings against police violence. As we brace ourselves for whatever 2022 may bring, join us in revisiting a few of these 2021 highlights from our investigative newsroom:
NEW YORK CITY, NY

Texas Troopers Opened Fire From a Helicopter in 2012. Families Are Still Fighting to Hold Them Accountable.

In the village of Varituc el Carmen in Guatemala’s highlands, Maria Maura is raising three children without a father. There’s not much time for dwelling on the past, only survival. The military has repeatedly cordoned off their community and placed it under quarantine because of the high rate of Covid-19 infections. Villagers can’t get to the market or to their fields to cultivate crops, which means constant hunger.
TEXAS STATE

Biden Is Breaking a Promise To Block Drilling on Public Lands

At the COP26 global climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, this month, President Biden vowed to “demonstrate to the world the United States is not only back at the table but hopefully leading by the power of our example.” Yet even as Biden urged world leaders to take action to avert catastrophic warming, a key piece of his approach to the climate crisis was missing: efforts to curb the expansion of fossil fuel production on public lands in the United States.
POTUS

The Backstory: Irene Romulo

Last May, Ida B. Wells fellow Irene Romulo published her investigation, “‘Gang Contracts’ in Cicero and Berwyn Schools Raise Concerns About Criminalization of Youth,” produced in partnership with Injustice Watch and the publication she co-founded, Cicero Independiente. In the story, Romulo revealed that over the past seven years, over 100 students in the predominantly Latinx, working-class suburbs of Cicero and Berwyn, Illinois, have signed “gang behavior contracts,” which prohibit them from engaging in what could be considered gang-related behavior and warn they could face escalating disciplinary measures for breaking the agreement. Throughout the article, Romulo links the current use of “gang contracts” to Cicero’s long history of criminalizing youth.
PUBLIC SAFETY