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Tuscaloosa News

Electric vehicle battery recycler announces new plant for Tuscaloosa County

A Canada-based battery recycler has announced plans to build a new recycling facility near Mercedes-Benz U.S. International in Tuscaloosa. Li-Cycle Holdings Corp. said its fourth North American lithium-ion battery recycling facility, or Spoke, in North America is expected to begin operations by mid-2022 and create more than 30 initial jobs.
TUSCALOOSA, AL
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wvpublic.org

UMWA Grapples With Coal’s Decline, An Uncertain Future

Miners at Warrior Met in Brookwood, Alabama have been on strike since the beginning of April. It’s a rare union action in the American South — especially these days when membership in the UMWA continues to decline. President Cecil Roberts, now in office for 26 years, has been walking the...
BROOKWOOD, AL
CleanTechnica

Alabama Will Get A Li-Cycle Battery Recycling Facility

Li-Cycle has announced plans to build a new lithium-ion battery recycling facility in Alabama. This will be its fourth commercial lithium-ion battery recycling facility and will be located in Tuscaloosa, AL. Previously, the company had a base plan for three North American facilities, or Spokes. These are planned for Kingston, Ontario; Rochester, New York; and Gilbert, Arizona, with the latter being in advanced execution stages.
ALABAMA STATE
kitco.com

Li-Cycle speeds up lithium-ion recycling roll out with fourth plant announcement

Li-Cycle Holdings (NYSE: LICY) said today it will build a fourth commercial lithium-ion battery recycling facility, to be located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. When completed, Li-Cycle estimates that its Spoke 4 facility will have an initial capacity of up to 5,000 tonnes of battery manufacturing scrap and end-of-life batteries per year, bringing Li-Cycle’s total North American recycling capacity to 25,000 tonnes per year.
TUSCALOOSA, AL
IN TUSCALOOSA
businessalabama.com

Shipt expands across country; Lithium-ion battery recycling plant coming to Tuscaloosa; Venture for America chooses Birmingham fellows

Shipt announces major expansion Birmingham-based Shipt announced what it’s calling its largest nationwide expansion in three years, adding Shipt access for 2 million more households across the U.S. and more than 1,000 store locations for all Shipt users. — Shipt Lithium-ion battery recycling plant coming to Tuscaloosa Li-Cycle will open a commercial lithium-ion…
TUSCALOOSA, AL
CBS42.com

Birmingham, Tuscaloosa see power outages as Ida impacts begin

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — Customers across Central Alabama are experiencing power outages as impacts from Ida begin to reach our area. Alabama Power reports over 13,000 customers have lost power across the state, a significant number of which are in CBS 42’s coverage area. Over 4,000 customers have lost power...
BIRMINGHAM, AL
Real News Network

The journalist who won’t give up on Alabama’s striking coal miners

Over 1,100 union coal miners in Brookwood, Alabama, have been on an unfair labor practices strike against Warrior Met Coal for over five months. And for five months, the mainstream media has barely made a peep about the strike. Instead, a small collection of independent journalists and local and progressive media outlets have been working overtime to cover this important story, including Jacob Morrison, David Story, and Adam Keller at The Valley Labor Report (Alabama’s only weekly labor radio talk show). There is one person, however, who has done more than anyone to lift the strike at Warrior Met into public consciousness for over five months straight, and that is independent journalist Kim Kelly. In Part II of our special Working People update on the miners’ strike at Warrior Met, Jacob Morrison from The Valley Labor Report guest hosts a wide-ranging conversation with Kelly about her labor and writing background, her experience covering the Amazon union drive and the Warrior Met strike in Alabama, and what it means to truly be invested in the people and struggles we cover in labor media.
ALABAMA STATE