TheMighty

Relationship AdvicePosted by
TheMighty

3 Tips for Navigating Marriage When a Spouse Has Multiple Chronic Illnesses

How does a marriage survive when more than one chronic condition falls into the picture? When a bombshell hits one of the spouses with very serious illnesses, the realization that it will be a part of their union for the rest of their lives can leave both in shock. There will be medical testing and physician appointments as part of their daily routine along with possible outpatient procedures or inpatient stays.
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Mental HealthPosted by
TheMighty

What Happened When I Reached Out for Help With OCD

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The mention of this condition is, in my experience, often met with an assumption the afflicted is plagued with physical compulsions such as excessive handwashing, checking or ordering of items. However, the obsessive element of OCD is often just as devastating — repetitive and unwanted thoughts plague the individual, causing profound distress and confusion. If the onset of OCD occurs later in life, as it did in my case, this confusion is magnified as the person grapples with thoughts like:
Family RelationshipsPosted by
TheMighty

How 15 Minutes Caused My Family Years of Trauma

“There’s someone in the house with your daughter.”. I stood there looking at my wife, wondering what was going on. She said it again a little more forcefully, and I simply said, “What are you talking about? How do you know?”. My daughter was texting her there was somebody in...
Family RelationshipsPosted by
TheMighty

Supporting My Daughter, a Sickle Cell Warrior

When you first meet my 5-year-old daughter Gia, you might notice how smart she is. She loves drawing, reading, and collecting toys. She enjoys watching Paw Patrol and My Little Pony and spending time with her big sister. But after spending some time with her you might also notice that she pays much more attention to drinking enough water and eating healthy foods than the average child. She is extremely aware of when her body needs to rest and has learned at a young age how to advocate for herself in hospitals and doctors’ offices. My daughter is a sickle cell warrior and one of the strongest people I know.
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

What Baking a Cake Taught Me About Being a Parent With Chronic Illness

I made cake this past Memorial Day. I had planned to make either jelly-filled cupcakes or a mostly-from-scratch two-layer cake with strawberry and whipped cream filling. With my rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flaring, I made a last-minute decision to make something involving a little less time standing. I started with a blue velvet box mix, hacked the heck out of it — milk, vanilla, mayonnaise, extra egg — plopped it into a 9×13 glass pan, and into the oven it went.
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

The Lessons I've Learned as a Young Stroke Survivor

I woke up in August and thought it was February. When I tried to eat Cheerios or my grandma’s chicken noodle soup, I was unable to bring my right hand to my mouth. I had to let my parents feed me as if I was an infant again. How was it Sunday when my open heart surgery was Thursday? I couldn’t figure out what was happening to me, what happened to four days of my life, or why I couldn’t do simple things I once took for granted, like feeding myself or having the ability to easily recall the day of the week and month of the year. I remember asking, “Mom, what happened?”
SocietyPosted by
TheMighty

The Daily Abuses You Experience as a Woman in the World

For most of us it starts at a surprisingly young age. The more I hear about it the less surprised I am. I was just old enough to be in kindergarten. My mother had taken my sister and I to the grocery store. My sister, probably about 4 years old, and I, about 5, were riding in the buggy while my mother shopped around. I recall a man. He stopped my mother just to comment on the pretty little girls with her, especially “that blond one.” Instances like this happened often.
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

The Worst Thing About Watching My Grandfather Battle Alzheimer’s

Few memories of childhood can be as sweet as those involving grandparents. In many ways, they are the heroes of some childhoods. Think about it — who else at that time in your life may have unlimited resources, always willing and ready to give you candy, money or the latest toy? Who else in your life at that time may have the ability to put your parents in their place and overrule what they say? Who else may think you do no wrong?
Performing ArtsPosted by
TheMighty

This Theatre Festival Features Playwrights and Performers on the Autism Spectrum

Last summer, after switching to an entirely digital platform, the Center for Applied Drama and Autism (CADA) solicited original, one-act scripts from around the world. Within a matter of weeks, CADA received eight excellent 10-20 minute plays from playwrights on the spectrum, with physical or developmental disabilities, or who are intimately connected with the disabled community. These playwrights, along with the directors and nearly 50 actors tasked with bringing their words to life, hail from India, New York, Texas, and even here in Akron. The plays will now be presented virtually all summer, each for a weekend of unlimited streaming and a talk-back with the cast and crew. CADA is committed to making its productions as accessible as possible, and will be including ASL interpretation, closed-captioning, and audio descriptions.
Mental HealthPosted by
TheMighty

Advocating for Myself After Being Discriminated at Work for My Mental Illness

Organizations often claim to prioritize employee wellness; in fact, the practice is very du jour to create mental health awareness campaigns and “wellness weeks” organization-wide. What is ironic and sad is how few organizations truly live up to their promise of supporting employee well-being and fostering positive mental health. In my experience, this is especially pronounced at nonprofit organizations, many of which grind their employees to dust while professing all the positive differences made in the lives of their stakeholders. As if the stakeholders’ needs outstrip employee needs for mental wellness and emotional safety. The hypocrisy is brazen. In my career, I have been the victim of organizational two-facedness, and it became one of the most tumultuous experiences of my life.
POTUSPosted by
TheMighty

What Juneteenth Means to Me

As I watched President Biden sign the bill to make Juneteenth a Federal holiday, my mind immediately was drawn to stories about Mary Jane Harris Palmore, my Granny’s grandmother. Born into slavery on the Palmore plantation in Powhatan, Virginia and daughter of Amanda Liggon and Richard Harris. At some point Mary Jane’s mother, Amanda, was sold to a plantation in another state. I can’t fathom the heartache, depression and anxiety that this must have caused Mary Jane, as she later would name one of her own daughters (my great-grandfather’s sister) Amanda. I, too, carry this name.
Mental HealthPosted by
TheMighty

Why I’m Scared of Recovering From My Mental Illnesses

Recovery from mental illness is complicated. Figuring out what recovery will realistically look like is complicated. The actual process of recovery is complicated. And figuring out how you feel about your recovery can be more complicated than others may think. My recovery is a lifelong process. Due to the nature...
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

What Mr. Rogers Reminded Me After Being Diagnosed With Parkinson’s

As a child, he walked into my living room each day and asked the simple question, “Won’t you be my neighbor?” With his cardigan sweaters, sneakers and simple, quiet ways, he took me and millions of children down many paths of discovery. He taught us beautiful lessons in his quiet way. Each and every day, he reminded me I was special just the way I was, and this simple lesson is something I need to remember every, single day.
Mental HealthPosted by
TheMighty

Facing Chronic Illness Treatment as a Survivor of Medical Child Abuse

Even as a young child, I always seemed to have some medical issue going on. I remember being in kindergarten and telling the school nurse about how I was unusually susceptible to strep throat. As I got older, the diagnoses piled on: An autoimmune condition, migraine, an immune deficiency, gastrointestinal (GI) issues… the list seemed to go on forever. By middle school, it seemed like I lived in hospitals. I was going several states away for doctor appointments regularly, I had infusions once a month, I never went more than a year without getting hospitalized. By age 16, I was on 56 pills a day.
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

Your Migraine Pain Is Still Valid Even If You're Smiling Through It

It’s Migraine Awareness Month and I wanted to talk about how we perceive people who deal with migraine attacks and pain. We often assume for someone to truly be in pain they should be in bed. For those who deal with migraine attacks and chronic migraine, we think of those who must be unable to function, possibly laying in a dark room, maybe throwing up. This may be the case for some people, but there are plenty of those who deal with chronic painful migraine attacks but still function in their daily activities.
HealthPosted by
TheMighty

Why I Felt Even More Isolated After a Recent Chronic Illness Flare

I have been chronically ill since I was a little girl. And even though I had my challenges as a child living with chronic illness, I was still able to engage in activities with my peers and live a somewhat “normal” life. I went to birthday parties, sleepovers, trips and did plenty of things, except when I had active infections, or asthma attacks or had to have procedures done. As time went on, I managed my conditions and life was fine.
Family RelationshipsPosted by
TheMighty

Let's Talk Trauma: How to Rewrite Toxic Family Rules

Everyone grows up with an understanding of the rules in their family. In healthy families, these rules are often about safety, growth and connection. Some healthy family rules might be: “No means no,” “Correct, but do not control,” “If it doesn’t feel safe, don’t do it.”. Toxic family rules often...