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LETTER: We’re all in this together

When responding to the Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade, it’s difficult to know where to begin. The repeal itself of the protections of reproductive rights leaves a large portion of the population in very real danger of disability, impoverishment — even death. That the law that went into immediate effect in our home state has no exceptions for survivors of rape and incest, and limited provisions for others, is appalling and negligent on the part of Louisiana lawmakers and our governor. The Acadiana Queer Collective stands with those who will be affected and will continue to advocate beside and for them.
LAFAYETTE, LA
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Louisiana bans abortion after Supreme Court ruling

This story was first reported by Louisiana Illuminator and republished with permission. Louisiana immediately banned almost all abortions — and its three abortion clinics stopped providing them — after the U.S. Supreme Court eliminated the federal right to an abortion by overturning its Roe v. Wade decision Friday morning.
LOUISIANA STATE

How should LCG spend your money?

Every year, while Lafayette goes on summer vacation, LCG figures out how to spend our money. It’s easy to tune out of the annual budget process. From introduction to adoption, the process takes three months and churns out a booklet hundreds of pages long that charts out how to spend $600 million.
LAFAYETTE, LA

How Lafayette commemorates Juneteenth

Lafayette’s Black community observed Juneteenth long before it was a state and federal holiday. For decades, churches and advocacy groups have commemorated the end of slavery by marking June 19, the day Union soliders arrived in Galveson, Texas, with news of liberation. Today, in the wake of a broader...
LAFAYETTE, LA

How Lafayette can show up and show Pride

Lafayette’s reputation as a front in culture war has gone national. Struggles for recognition and most recently a decision to scrap Pride Month book displays at the public library have earned Lafayette unwanted recognition for exclusion, especially when it comes to the LGBTQ+ community. But advocates see reason for...
LAFAYETTE, LA

LETTER: We cannot stand silent

Last week, the Lafayette Public Library’s Director, Danny Gillane, announced that the library system would no longer be creating displays highlighting national and local celebrations such as Pride and Black History months, as well as any others which highlight only a specific part of the local population, such as Cajun & Creole culture, and any religious or other group specific topics. While not outright stated, it must be assumed this includes works which highlight disabilities, as well. This proclamation was put forth in an attempt, according to Gillane, to remove the library system and its workers from the front lines of the political culture wars.
LAFAYETTE, LA

COLUMN: Lafayette needs its own mayor, and we’re losing our chance to get one

Lafayette is a city without a mayor. It’s been that way since the 1990s, and it doesn’t look like it’s going to change any time soon. We have likely passed the point that champions of city autonomy have warned about for years now. The population of the city of Lafayette may no longer make up the majority of the parish. That means our city is stuck without a full-time leader who is focused solely on city business and who is accountable to city residents.
LAFAYETTE, LA

Lafayette’s state budget haul shovels millions into I-49, flood protection, UL and a new performing arts center

Barring line-item vetoes, Lafayette Parish, its municipalities and public institutions stand to benefit from tens of millions of dollars, perhaps more, from the $39 billion state budget bill for FY 2023 and the capital outlay bill the Legislature passed late last week. Lafayette has powerful representation come budget season, counting...
LAFAYETTE, LA

A half-century later, Tommy McLain finds God — and the spotlight

The greeting, cheered by the initial volunteer to lay eyes on Tommy McLain, is the first of many thematic salutations he would hear throughout this blaring Friday afternoon, the final weekend of the 2022 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Later, from a Lagniappe stagehand, tending to him two hours prior to showtime: “Those are beautiful boots! Gorgeous.” From a vocal fest goer, welcoming him and longtime friend and collaborator C.C. Adcock from the crowd: “Liking those boots, Tommy!”
NEW ORLEANS, LA