ContributorsPublishersAdvertisers

The Chicago Maroon

The War at Home

The war in Ukraine has been raging since February. How has life been for Russian and Ukrainian students who are far from the fighting?. Since the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014, tensions between Russia and Ukraine have been steadily increasing. The recent February 2022 invasion of Ukraine has turned these tensions into outright war. While these events may seem distant to some, for Ukrainian and Russian students at UChicago, the fighting raging halfway around the world is deeply personal.
WORLD
Picture for The War at Home

University Removes Booster Requirement Starting September

New rules require two doses of vaccine, negating the booster requirement for many. The University of Chicago announced on Tuesday that it will no longer require students and employees to receive more than two COVID-19 vaccine doses, effective September 16. Members of the University community are now only required to...
CHICAGO, IL
Picture for University Removes Booster Requirement Starting September
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Break the Love Breaks the Glass Ceiling, Offers Safe Space for Female “Everyday Athletes”

Trisha Goyal, the founder of tech platform Break the Love who was previously heralded by Business Insider as one of sport’s youngest CEOs, plays tennis “like a girl.”. In just under four years after its birth in 2019, Break the Love has transcended its core service as an accessible, comprehensive online hub for connecting like-minded and similarly skilled tennis players, now standing as the catalyst motivating and empowering a new wave of women taking up the sport. Collaboration lies at the heart of Break The Love, from the platform’s promotional language to its progression to success, and it pushes back against the gatekeeping, elitism, and sexism that has potential players turning their backs on the court.
CHICAGO, IL

Break the Love Breaks the Glass Ceiling, Offers Safe Space for Female “Everyday Athletes”

Trisha Goyal, the founder of tech platform Break the Love who was previously heralded by Business Insider as one of sport’s youngest CEOs, plays tennis “like a girl.”. In just under four years after its birth in 2019, Break the Love has transcended its core service as an accessible, comprehensive online hub for connecting like-minded and similarly skilled tennis players, now standing as the catalyst motivating and empowering a new wave of women taking up the sport. Collaboration lies at the heart of Break The Love, from the platform’s promotional language to its progression to success, and it pushes back against the gatekeeping, elitism, and sexism that has potential players turning their backs on the court.
CHICAGO, IL

Polsky Exchange Reopens With New Programming and Opportunities for Local Entrepreneurs

Executive Director Abigail Ingram Discusses Summer Accelerators, Financial Fundamentals, and Mentorship Training. The Polsky Exchange is undergoing a soft reopening after being closed for several months because of the pandemic. The Polsky Exchange, which aims to serve UChicago and the South Side through entrepreneurship programs and research, has been made accessible to student entrepreneurs and community business members since June 14.
CHICAGO, IL

Second-Year Missing Since Early May

The missing student, Diwen Fan, is five feet, eight inches tall; weighs 154 pounds; and has black hair. Second-year Diwen Fan has been missing for more than a month, according to a statement emailed to students on June 10 by Dean of Students in the College John “Jay” Ellison. Fan’s family is offering a $10,000 reward to any member of the public with information that could help locate him.
CHICAGO, IL

Second-Year Missing Since Early May

The missing student, Diwen Fan, is five feet, eight inches tall; weighs 154 pounds; and has black hair. Second-year Diwen Fan has been missing for more than a month, according to a statement emailed to students on June 10 by Dean of Students in the College John “Jay” Ellison. Fan’s family is offering a $10,000 reward to any member of the public with information that could help locate him.
CHICAGO, IL

Congratulations, Class of 2022! | Newsletter for June 9

Subscribe to the Maroon Newsletter. What a journey it’s been. Writing this newsletter as we wrap up this school year, I can’t help but think back to the day I took the role of managing editor from Adyant Kanakamedala, who taught me so much about running the student newspaper at UChicago. There are many people to thank along the way, but at the top of my list are the upperclassmen who made my college experience complete. It is through our peers that we made a community out of our time at UChicago and created precious collective memories even during a pandemic.
CHICAGO, IL

Congratulations, Class of 2022! | Newsletter for June 9

Subscribe to the Maroon Newsletter. What a journey it’s been. Writing this newsletter as we wrap up this school year, I can’t help but think back to the day I took the role of managing editor from Adyant Kanakamedala, who taught me so much about running the student newspaper at UChicago. There are many people to thank along the way, but at the top of my list are the upperclassmen who made my college experience complete. It is through our peers that we made a community out of our time at UChicago and created precious collective memories even during a pandemic.
CHICAGO, IL

Class of 1972 Alums Discuss Jane Collective, Future of Abortion Access

The mugshot of Sheila Smith Avruch (A.B. ’72) from when she was arrested. Reproductive rights activists convened in the Logan Center on May 21 to discuss the past, present, and future of abortion. Alum Sheila Smith Avruch spoke about the Jane Collective, colloquially referred to as “the Janes,” an underground abortion ring in Hyde Park during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Moderated by human rights professor Susan Gzesh (A.B. ’72), the panel also included Shira Fishbach (A.B. ’17, M.D. ’22), an incoming obstetrics and gynecology resident at the University of Michigan; Bryan Howard, president of Planned Parenthood Arizona; and Ameri Klafeta, director of the Women’s and Reproductive Rights Project for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Illinois.
WOMEN'S HEALTH

Dreamy and Bright, Yumi Zouma Plays at Lincoln Hall After a Pandemic Pause

I stumbled upon the band Yumi Zouma a few years ago when I first heard one of its songs in the background of a vegan recipe video on YouTube. There was just something so warm and airy about the way lead singer Christie Simpson sang the lyrics “everything has changed” in “In Camera” that made me shamelessly hunt down the song; I haven’t stopped listening to the New Zealand band since. Dreamy guitar lines and gentle drumming are instrumental to this group’s indie-pop sound, and after years of Spotify streaming, I ducked into Lincoln Hall on a rainy night in April, ready to finally hear the band live.
PUBLIC HEALTH

I’m Afraid of "Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"

James Turano as George, Andrea Uppling as Martha, Keenan Odenkirk as Nick, and Rachel Livingston as Honey. The performance space of the Invictus Theatre Company is small—smaller, certainly, than I anticipated, a black box on Chicago’s North Side set up to seat perhaps thirty guests a night for this season’s production: Edward Albee’s American classic, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? In this configuration, the audience, pressed close in four tight rows, takes up less space than the modest, cottage-style living room that stretches across the stage. The actors wear no microphones because the front row is close enough to reach out and touch them. Shattered bottles and violent shouts send the audience recoiling in their chairs. If nothing else, Invictus Theatre’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is an eminently personal experience.
CHICAGO, IL

“Men” Brings Alex Garland Into Surreal and Unfamiliar Territory

Yet with “Men,” I relished the discomfort inherent in its inscrutability instead of shying away from it. It is always fascinating to see how success affects a director’s output. There are some who use the bigger budgets they are afforded to double down on the notes they’ve hit with their first films. The allegorical horror of Jordan Peele (Get Out and Us) and the sumptuous, psychologically complex period pieces of Robert Eggers (The Witch, The Lighthouse, and The Northman) come to mind. There are some who seem to be preternaturally incapable of entering a comfort zone in their filmmaking. Consider the Coen brothers. Their career has spanned the full gamut of genre, from noir to screwball comedy to gangster epic to Western to…well, the list goes on. One would be forgiven for thinking that their first two features, Blood Simple and Raising Arizona, were made by completely different filmmakers.
MOVIES

“Wounded Knee III in Unsettled Ground” Destabilizes Conversations Around the Ground Beneath Our Feet

[“Unsettled Ground”] conceptualizes different ideas around how the environment shapes cultures and communities beyond the Western scope. The light outside shines into the right-side gallery of the Smart Museum of Art, as exhibit viewers converse about which artwork they like best. As if some force of nature is in conversation with the exhibition, the attic light shines brightly upon all of the artworks in their different mediums (photography, woodcut print, sculpture, weaving), illuminating distinct narratives around environmental determinism: the belief that the environment, especially its physical factors, determine the patterns of human culture and societal development. Organized by the Feitler Center for Academic Inquiry, Unsettled Ground: Art and Environment from the Smart Museum Collection is collaboratively curated by Katerina Korola (Ph.D.’21) and undergraduate and graduate students from her seminary. The exhibit conceptualizes different ideas around how the environment shapes cultures and communities beyond the Western scope.
MUSEUMS

The Maroon Staff

To the Class of 2022: What a four years it’s been. The Maroon explores environmental issues on campus and beyond. Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law accused UChicago’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association of serving the Chinese Communist Party after the organization asked Harris administrators to withdraw invitation of Law at a Harris School event.
COOK COUNTY, IL

The Maroon Staff

To the Class of 2022: What a four years it’s been. The Maroon explores environmental issues on campus and beyond. Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law accused UChicago’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association of serving the Chinese Communist Party after the organization asked Harris administrators to withdraw invitation of Law at a Harris School event.
COOK COUNTY, IL

Steve Martin’s “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” Provides Good Humor and Little Else

(From left to right) Philip C. Matthews as Freddy, Travis Ascione as Picasso, and Dan Deuel as Gaston in "Picasso at the Lapin Agile." This April, near Lake Forest, Illinois, Citadel Theatre Company closed its 20th season with Steve Martin’s Picasso at the Lapin Agile. Written by the Steve Martin, Picasso premiered in 1993 at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Studio Theatre. The play imagines a turn-of-the-twentieth-century Paris bar where Pablo Picasso and Albert Einstein meet. Amid interruptions from colorful bar patrons, their discussion explores genius, talent, and intellectualism. At its heart, though, Picasso is a slapstick comedy.
LAKE FOREST, IL

Letter In Response to “The Line Between Institutional Neutrality and Complacency”

After being personally mentioned in a recent column, economics professor Harald Uhlig responds. In a recent Maroon column “The Line Between Institutional Neutrality and Complacency,” Cherie Fernandes argues that the principles of the Kalven Report are used to prevent scholars and students at the University from tackling tough and controversial subjects and taking political stances. I am delighted to see student interest in the important topic of free speech on campus: Meaningful debates are at the core of what the University of Chicago is all about.
CHICAGO, IL