#Water Year

Environmentnatureworldnews.com

Extreme Heat Could Possibly Prompt Power Outage and Shortage of Water

An exceptional drought in the West, together with desiccated lakes and reservoirs, implies there will be insufficient water for hydroelectric energy, farms, and domestic use. There are signs of a dry present and future across the western United States. From wildfires blazing across the Pacific Northwest to the shrink reservoirs in California, it seems the earth is very parched for the second summer consecutively.
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Environmenteturbonews.com

Lake Powell Disappearing: So sad for tourism!

Climate change just became a reality and a big issue for the tourism industry at Lake Powell, one of the most popular resort region in Arizona and Utah, USA. Climate change has become real in Arizona and Utah with Lake Powell in trouble. At Lake Powell the water line has...
Picture for Lake Powell Disappearing: So sad for tourism!
California StateMarin Independent Journal

California drought: Dozens of communities are at risk of running out of water

In Fort Bragg on the Mendocino Coast, city leaders are rushing to install an emergency desalination system. In Healdsburg, lawn watering is banned with fines of up to $1,000. In Hornbrook, a small town in Siskiyou County, faucets have gone completely dry, and the chairman of the water district is driving 15 miles each way to take showers and wash clothes.
Picture for California drought: Dozens of communities are at risk of running out of water
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California StatePosted by
dreamcatcher_mahdi

Stone Columns of Lake Crowley: the hidden gem of California

Amazing lake crowly: the hidden gem of Californiadreamcatcher_mahdi. If you want to see a natural magical wonder in California, you should visit these amazing stone columns of Lake Crowley. These columns are located nearby Highway 395, though there is no easy access to reach the columns. I have driven this highway many times. Little did I know the columns were located there. Anyway, last year I decided to visit these beautiful columns on the shore of Lake Crowley, which is originally a reservoir created in 1941 by the Log Angeles Department of Water and Power. Good thing is that there is no hike involved, well, maybe a little bit. But the important thing is you will need a four-wheel drive to reach the parking lot. The road is impassable without a 4WD in the last part. We saw many people driving 2WD, but they could not make it to the last with their vehicles. They parked somewhere before the last stretch and hiked the rest. So, if you are driving to Lake Crowley with a two-wheel drive, be prepared to hike the last part.
Oroville, CADaily Democrat

Projection: Lake Oroville could reach record low by November

OROVILLE — As drought conditions continue throughout Butte County, the Department of Water Resources is currently projecting that the surface water level of Lake Oroville could reach an all-time low of 640 feet above sea level by October or November. As of Thursday, Lake Oroville’s surface water level was 648.47...
Oregon StateEast Oregonian

Eastern Oregon counties object to River Democracy Act

ENTERPRISE, Ore. — At least two counties in rural Eastern Oregon are raising objections to the River Democracy Act, an ambitious federal bill that would add nearly 4,700 miles of wild and scenic rivers across the state. The Wallowa County Board of Commissioners opposed the legislation in a resolution passed...
EnvironmentPhys.org

How fire today will impact water tomorrow

In 2020, Colorado battled the four largest wildfires in its history, leaving residents anxious for another intense wildfire season this year. But last week, fires weren't the issue—it was their aftermath. When heavy rains fell over the burn scar from the 2020 Cameron Peak fire, they triggered flash flooding and mudslides northwest of Fort Collins which destroyed homes, killed at least three people and damaged major roads. Flooding along the 2020 Grizzly Creek and East Troublesome burn scars also unleashed mudslides across Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon and in Grand County just west of Rocky Mountain National Park.
Red Lodge, MTCarbon County News

“Devastating” Carbon Summer for Ag:

Both the Clear Creek and the Last Chance Ditches (south of Red Lodge and by Joliet, respectively) have been repaired and water flows restored after blowouts but losses this season continue. Speaking about this growing season, Last Chance Ditch Company President, Joe Yedlicka, said earlier, “Economically, it’s been pretty devastating.”...
Miles City, MTagupdate.com

A look at the 2021 drought in comparison to previous droughts

Production agriculture is a life dependent entirely on the weather and those who chose to make a living raising food for the rest of the population are well aware of the adherent risks. That doesn’t make years like 2021 any easier though when drought conditions get so tough that cattle need to be culled and crops fail due to heat stress.
Environmentlakewaymud.org

Water Matters: Aug-Nov 2021 edition

National Water Quality Month (August) is dedicated to making the most of the relatively small amount of fresh water we have, because having clean water is vital to our individual health, our collective agricultural needs, and the needs of our environment. When Natural Disasters Strike, Be Prepared. For the first...
Environmentcoyotegulch.blog

How fire today will impact water tomorrow — CU Boulder Today

In 2020, Colorado battled the four largest wildfires in its history, leaving residents anxious for another intense wildfire season this year. But last week, fires weren’t the issue—it was their aftermath. When heavy rains fell over the burn scar from the 2020 Cameron Peak fire, they triggered flash flooding and mudslides northwest of Fort Collins which destroyed homes, killed at least three people and damaged major roads. Flooding along the 2020 Grizzly Creek and East Troublesome burn scars also unleashed mudslides across Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon and in Grand County just west of Rocky Mountain National Park.
Utah County, UTetvnews.com

Fishing Limits Increased at More Utah Waterbodies Due to Low Water Levels

In anticipation of continued low water levels due to extreme drought conditions across the state, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources issued more emergency changes to Utah’s fishing regulations on Wednesday. Those changes will allow anglers to catch and keep more fish at some additional waterbodies around the state. Drought...
Page, AZPosted by
High Country News

Climate change sinks Lake Powell, local rec industry

This story was originally published by the Guardian as part of their two-year series, This Land is Your Land, examining the threats facing America’s public lands, with support from the Society of Environmental Journalists, and is republished by permission. Chaos erupted at Bill West’s business in Page, Arizona, last week...
EnvironmentPosted by
The Hill

Climate change wrecks two US lakes

Lakes Mead and Powell are posting record low water levels, fueled by the West’s persistent megadrought. Officials have attributed the prolonged changes and high temperatures to climate change. Nearby communities depend on the water reserves for drinking and agriculture uses. The second largest reservoir in the U.S, Lake Powell, is...
Colorado StatePosted by
The Water Desk

Facing drought and increased demands, Colorado communities eye new storage alternatives

Colorado could need more than 750,000 acre-feet of new water supplies by 2050 to meet the demands of a growing population. But how to store that water, something historically done using dams and reservoirs, some massive in scale, isn’t clear. And cities, water planners and environmentalists, from Steamboat Springs to Sterling, are looking way beyond concrete to find new storage alternatives that minimize evaporative losses, enhance the environment, and provide security for the region in the face of chronic drought.
AgriculturePosted by
KVIA ABC-7

Chile harvest starts early for some southern New Mexico farmers

HATCH, New Mexico — The aroma of fresh roasted green chiles is already wafting through southern New Mexico as some farmers are getting a jumpstart on the harvest. The earlier start to the season is the result of some much needed rain, cooler temperatures and a change in the way some farmers are planting the state's most The post Chile harvest starts early for some southern New Mexico farmers appeared first on KVIA.
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