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#Sukkot

100 Sukkot Greetings and Wishes to Send Love to Your Jewish Friends and Family This Harvest Holiday

Sukkot is one of the most festive Jewish holidays, but it’s also one of the least understood. The harvest season and the struggles of Israelites in their exodus from slavery are both elements to Sukkot, which is marked by many Jewish believers by dining in huts made of natural materials called Sukkahs. Get to know what Sukkot is and why Sukkot is celebrated, as well as 100 ways to wish your loved ones a happy Sukkot.
CELEBRATIONS
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jewishboston.com

A Sukkot Story for the Pandemic Generations

Mazel tov! We’ve made it through a second pandemic High Holy Days and reached Sukkot, the season of our joy. Most Jewish holidays have a core story. Passover is zman cheiruteinu, the time of our liberation. Shavuot is zman matan torateinu, the time we were given the Torah. Hanukkah and Purim each have a story. Even Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur have the narratives of the birthday of the world, and the day of judgement, with the timely imagery of the book of life. Most of our holidays have a narrative that connects our observance of that day with a historic, calendar-linked event.
RELIGION
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TRENDING TOPICS
algemeiner.com

Why We Need Sukkot

After watching the recent Afghanistan debacle unfold, I could not help but be reminded of the Suez Crisis of 1956 — with a sense of foreboding and terror about what the future holds for those who treasure the freedoms and comforts of the Western world. Truthfully, it wasn’t the shocking...
U.K.
jns.org

Bring on the fondue for a savory Sukkot

Sukkot, or the “Festival of Booths,” is celebrated on the 15th day of Tishri. Earlier on the secular calendar this year, it won’t be celebrated deep into the fall and colder weather so will probably be on the warmer side in most of the United States. It begins at sundown on Monday, Sept. 20, and lasts through sundown on Monday, Sept. 27, followed by Simchat Torah on Sept. 28. It’s customary to eat meals in a sukkah, the symbol of the hastily constructed booths built by the Israelites during the 40-year trek across the desert. Family, friends and neighbors gather to eat meals (and for some, to sleep) in the sukkah.
FESTIVAL
jns.org

From Suez to Afghanistan: A Sukkot message

After watching the recent Afghanistan debacle unfold, I could not help but be reminded of the 1956 Suez Crisis—with a sense of foreboding and terror about what the future holds for those who treasure the freedoms and comforts of the Western world. Truthfully, it wasn’t the shocking scenes of Afghan citizens desperately running alongside a U.S. military cargo plane at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul that I found so discomforting, although those images are seared on my mind forever; nor was it the shocking revelation that the U.S. military left billions of dollars worth of military hardware in Afghanistan, weaponry now controlled by an evil terrorist regime.
MIDDLE EAST
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