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Exploring the ordinary and extraordinary in end-of-life care, death

Samuel LeBaron, MD, PhD, is a family medicine specialist and Stanford Medicine professor emeritus who now faces the situation he guided patients through during his career: navigating terminal lung cancer. In his memoir, Ordinary Deaths, published in July, LeBaron weaves personal stories with vignettes that illuminate the patients whose lives he's witnessed.
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Futurity

There’s no ‘golden rule’ for when kids should get their first phone

A new study finds no meaningful association between the age at which children receive their first phones and their well-being, as measured by grades, sleep habits, and depression symptoms. The study is unusual because it followed a group of more than 250 children for five years during which most of...
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oncologynurseadvisor.com

Risk of COVID-19 and Poor Outcomes Not Increased Among Glioma Patients

Patients with glioma do not have an increased risk of COVID-19 diagnosis or worse outcomes from COVID-19, according to research presented in a poster at the Society for Neuro-Oncology 27th Annual Meeting.1. The incidence of COVID-19 in this single-center study of glioma patients was lower than the incidence of COVID-19...
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arcamax.com

Could these antiviral pills treat long COVID?

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Could Paxlovid solve one of the pandemic’s biggest puzzles? A new study at Stanford University aims to find out. In the nation’s first medical trial of an antiviral strategy to treat long COVID, scientists are testing the drug to see if it helps ease the misery of fatigue, brain fog, shortness of breath, body aches, digestive symptoms and heart problems.
morns.ca

As COVID cases rise, China locks down despite criticism

The COVID-19 restrictions are at the heart of the unrest in China as the country grapples with a rising number of infections after years of quarantine policies. CNN reports there is “a growing torrent of dissent toward China’s unrelenting zero-Covid lockdowns.” A fatal fire in an apartment building in Xinjiang has raised further questions, with residents in that city restricted to their homes for more than three months, according to the New York Times. An estimated one-fifth of the country is under restrictions, and more than 1.3 million people in China are under medical observation this week after being exposed to the virus, the Financial Times reported.
stanford.edu

We are Stanford Med: #ThisIsMyWhy with Asma Dahir

They're students, clinicians, scientists and researchers. They're also artists, influencers, patients, scholars and advocates. They hail from all over the globe and come to Stanford Medicine carrying big ideas and dreams. With passions that stretch beyond the lab, classroom and clinic, they share their "why" as they pursue science and medicine.
STANFORD, CA
AMA

“Try harder” isn’t the fix for physician burnout. Learn what is.

The prevalence of physician burnout during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic was 38.2%, the lowest ever recorded. By the end of 2021, that percentage ballooned to 62.8%, the highest since the AMA first partnered with Stanford Medicine and the Mayo Clinic to track burnout among physicians in 2011.
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