CreatorsPublishersAdvertisers

#Sonic Youth

NPR

World Cafe 30th Anniversary Playlist: 1992

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of World Cafe, we'll be looking back and posting playlists from each year of the show. As music has evolved over the years, so have our playlists, which have grown to reflect many genres and styles of music. In 1992, while grunge rock continued to...
MUSIC
Picture for World Cafe 30th Anniversary Playlist: 1992
spainsnews.com

The thousand children of the Velvet Underground

In 1969, the spiny Jonathan Richman He was 18 years old and moved from Boston to New York after listening to the first two Velvet Underground albums. Back home, he instantly formed a band, The Modern Lovers, and also got John Cale to record some demos for them in 1972. Then they separated, reformed and released their first album in 1976, with part of the material with Cale. Richman was influenced by Velvet and he ended up influencing new wave and punk. Model transmission belt.
MUSIC
Picture for The thousand children of the Velvet Underground
slugmag.com

Review: WEAK SIGNAL – BIANCA

WEAK SIGNAL’s second full length album, BIANCA, is an atmospheric bath of high energy masked behind lethargic outpourings of static and reverb. The band’s sound is a familiar one, but there are aspects here that keep WEAK SIGNAL on the refreshing side of the dial. BIANCA begins with a bass...
ROCK MUSIC
Picture for Review: WEAK SIGNAL – BIANCA
TRENDING TOPICS
Spin

Not Fade Away: Our 1995 Neil Young Cover Story

This article originally appeared in the September 1995 issue of SPIN. It’s getting harder and harder to remember that, for much of his career, Neil Young has been regarded—if loved—as a self-destructive oddball. Even in his most celebrated decade, the 1970s, he shelved entire albums; others, such as Time Fades Away and On the Beach, were so determinedly marginal that they’ve never been reissued on CD. Then, in the ’80s, he released a notorious series of rockabilly, synth-pop, and country experiments so off-putting that his label, Geffen, eventually sued him for not sounding like himself.
MUSIC
stljewishlight.org

They were the most important band of the 80s — even if they broke up a decade before

When I think of the 1980s, I think of The Velvet Underground. Sure, the band itself had ceased to exist in any meaningful way back in August 1970, when Lou Reed walked out and went home to Long Island following a legendary stand at Max’s Kansas City. And sure, there was little to no evidence of the VU’s sound and aesthetic anywhere to be found on the U.S. pop charts during the Reagan Years. But on the indie and college radio charts, the ones that really mattered to me and my friends, the influence of the Velvets was everywhere.
ROCK MUSIC
Daily Orange

Cheryl Dunn’s ‘Licking the Bowl’ film frames skateboarding as real, undeniable art

Get the latest Syracuse news delivered right to your inbox. Subscribe to our newsletter here. Cheryl Dunn’s 2002 short “Licking the Bowl,” on view at the Everson Museum of Art, frames skateboarding as something new: not just an artform, but an artwork. The 15-minute film follows a community of skaters that formed around a skate bowl built into the Wexner Center for the Arts in Ohio, where Dunn was completing an art residency.
SYRACUSE, NY
artforum.com

Fallen Art Star Charged with Peddling Raymond Pettibon Forgeries

Brazil-born artist Christian Rosa, described just seven years ago in the pages of this publication as “stratospherically successful,” has been charged with wire fraud in relation to the sale of four forgeries attributed to Raymond Pettibon, whom he had in recent years befriended, the New York Times reports. In a federal indictment announced yesterday, Rosa was charged with selling the works, backed by fake certificates of authenticity on which he had forged the noted artist’s signature, to two separate buyers. If convicted, Rosa faces up to twenty years in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
classicsdujour.com

CDJ Today: October 15 in Classic Rock

October 15, 2006 – Patti Smith headlines the final night of the infamous club, CBGB in New York City, which closes due to $300,000 owed in unpaid back rent. She says, “CBGB is both the scrappy symbol of rock’s promise and a temple that no one wanted to see go.” With an open booking policy, its founder, Hilly Kristal, nurtured New York rock’s greatest generation, including the Ramones, Blondie, Talking Heads, Television and Sonic Youth, and in turn those groups made CBGB one of the few rock clubs known by name around the world.
NEW YORK CITY, NY
Forward

They were the most important band of the 80s — even if they broke up a decade before

When I think of the 1980s, I think of The Velvet Underground. Sure, the band itself had ceased to exist in any meaningful way back in August 1970, when Lou Reed walked out and went home to Long Island following a legendary stand at Max’s Kansas City. And sure, there was little to no evidence of the VU’s sound and aesthetic anywhere to be found on the U.S. pop charts during the Reagan Years. But on the indie and college radio charts, the ones that really mattered to me and my friends, the influence of the Velvets was everywhere.
ROCK MUSIC
NME

Bush Tetras drummer Dee Pop has died aged 65

Dee Pop, best known as the drummer of New York post-punk band Bush Tetras, has died aged 65. His death was confirmed by bandmates Cynthia Sley and Pat Place, who shared a statement (via Pitchfork) revealing that Pop died in his sleep on Saturday night (October 9). “Dee Pop was...
MUSIC
East Bay Express

Danger for Sale: A few things to look for while watching Todd Haynes’ ‘The Velvet Underground’

Todd Haynes doesn’t want us to forget about the Velvet Underground. That long-gone rock band is one of the filmmaker’s musical Pick Hits, alongside former Haynes biopic subjects Bob Dylan, Stephen Sondheim, Sonic Youth, David Bowie and Karen Carpenter. Haynes’ latest film, The Velvet Underground, rates special handling because the Velvets were simultaneously more dangerous and more attractive than the rest. The new film is a hypnotic, kaleidoscopic, split-screen, rapid-montage, black-and-white documentary exercise in disorienting adulation, so thick with allusions that it would take a list to piece together the splintered impressions.
MOVIES
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE