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‘Settlers’ Does Home Invasion & Stockholm Syndrome In Space When They Could’ve Stayed Home [Review]

As our society has watched the likes of billionaire Richard Branson and Amazon mastermind Jeff Bezos proclaim themselves interstellar pioneers with their recent self-funded forays to the edge of space, it’s serendipitous to see a newly released movie about people inhabiting Mars following an ecological disaster on Earth and a story that unfolds where things predictably go awry. Though said effort, entitled “Settlers” and helmed by Wyatt Rockefeller, foregoes the sleek spacecraft Branson & Bezos have both commandeered in favor of a stark, eroded landscape appropriate for the red planet. However, as potentially prescient and resonant its setup is — colonizers having to inhabit Mars because we neglected and ignored our climate change warnings and cataclysm struck — “Settlers” is ultimately little more than a bit of style and a smattering of substance. Perhaps it has more in common with the aforementioned self-satisfied space billionaires than one thought.
Picture for ‘Settlers’ Does Home Invasion & Stockholm Syndrome In Space When They Could’ve Stayed Home [Review]
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MoviesPolygon

The indie sci-fi film Settlers feels subversive, but maybe not on purpose

Language is a slippery thing, and our subjectivity and lived experience can shape the definition of a word. Take the word “settler.” In the U.S., the word is historically associated with the European occupation of the Americas, and it brings to mind a certain narrative: the sprawling, unfriendly frontier, the aggressive act of bending the land to one’s will, and the assumption of wide-open areas, ready to be tamed. That final element of emptiness is key to the romanticization of staking a claim, and the strongest component of the indie sci-fi Western Settlers is how it understands that corruption and colonialism go hand in hand.
TV SeriesDecider

Stream It Or Skip It: ‘Settlers’ on VOD, a Sparse Sci-Fi Drama Set on the Dreary and Dusty Mars Frontier

Now on VOD, Settlers is one of those where-do-they-pee?-oh-THAT’S-where-they-pee stories of hardscrabble frontier life. Except in this case, the frontier is on Mars, a dusty, reddish desert of rock and dust and sadness, where writer/director Wyatt Rockefeller deposits a three-piece family to do their best. It ain’t easy, especially when there’s a lurking danger on the horizon. Let’s see if they’re fit enough to survive.
Moviespunchdrunkcritics.com

‘Settlers’ Interview: Wyatt Rockefeller On Making The Martian Sci-Fi Drama His Directing Debut

Imagine most of the blockbuster sci-fi movies you’ve seen that have been set on Mars. I’m betting none of them are anything like Settlers. Wyatt Rockefeller’s debut feature is a tense, claustrophobic chamber piece about a family living on an isolated farm on Mars, long after humanity has fled Earth. This makeshift life is interrupted by the arrival of a mysterious stranger looking to reclaim what he says is his. When violence erupts, it changes the life of 9-year-old Remmy who learns the hard way that life on this frontier is kill or be killed.
Moviesnewsbrig.com

Settlers review: A sci-fi movie questions a Martian colony, then falls apart

Language is a slippery thing, and our subjectivity and lived experience can shape the definition of a word. Take the word “settler.” In the U.S., the word is historically associated with the European occupation of the Americas, and it brings to mind a certain narrative: the sprawling, unfriendly frontier, the aggressive act of bending the land to one’s will, and the assumption of wide-open areas, ready to be tamed. That final element of emptiness is key to the romanticization of staking a claim, and the strongest component of the indie sci-fi Western Settlers is how it understands that corruption and colonialism go hand in hand.
Moviesscreenanarchy.com

Review: SETTLERS, Wherever We Go, There We Are

Uniquely American, the Western genre has changed radically over the last century, from nationalistic, myth-building propaganda to revisionist self-critique, specifically of the colonialist narrative that centered white Europeans and left indigenous Americans, in the margins at best or primitive, violent savages at worse. Less rectified than simply ignored or set...
RestaurantsPosted by
Mashed

The Fishy Restaurant: Impossible Burger Robert Irvine Called Delicious

If there's one takeaway from Food Network's "Restaurant: Impossible," it's that when host and British chef Robert Irvine gives you advice, the best course of action is to follow it to a T. Despite how stubborn the chefs are, or how lazy the manager may be, Irvine always manages to get his way. Within two days, he tweaks family recipes while preserving restaurant legacies. In addition, he modernizes outdated menus and interiors, ultimately paving the way for restaurants to have successful futures.
Albany County, NYTimes Union

Letter: Governor should reject low carbon concrete bill

The Rockefeller Institute of Government just published "Concrete Solutions to Climate Change," encouraging the use of low carbon concrete in local government. This follows the Low Embodied Carbon Concrete Leadership Act, LECCLA, passed by the state Legislature in June, which puts industry insiders in charge of writing public policy on CO2 in concrete.
Businessmodernsurvivalblog.com

Supply Chain Shortages – Preparing For Breakdown

Supply chain shortages are everywhere. Seemingly affecting all industries to varying extents. We all know what happened in 2020. Therefore we all know the underlying causation. The effects (supply chain shortages) continue to ripple through the world. Consequently, all sorts of industry are affected by these shortages. Many, hidden from...
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