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#Race Discrimination

Montgomery Advertiser

AG Marshall should be ashamed, embarrassed about what he put Selma officers through

Attorney General Steve Marshall should be ashamed of himself for torturing Selma police officers Jeff Hardy, Tori Neely, and Kendall Thomas. He should also be embarrassed that on August 13, 2021, on the eve of their vindication in a trial they were certain to win, he (Marshall) dismissed all charges against the officers.
SELMA, AL
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Dadeville Record

Dadeville Elementary teacher sues Tallapoosa County BOE for race discrimination

A former Dadeville Elementary School librarian is suing the Tallapoosa County Board of Education for racial discrimination, alleging she was demoted to pre-Kindergarten teacher and replaced by a less-qualified white woman. Shirley Barnes, an African-American woman and 18-year library media-specialist at Dadeville Elementary, alleges then-assistant principal Diane Miller "created a...
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deathpenaltyinfo.org

OUTLIERCOUNTIES: Ohio Death-Row Prisoner Challenges Sentence Based on Hamilton County Race Discrimination Study

An African-American man sentenced to death in Hamilton County, Ohio in 1999 for the murder of a white man is seeking to overturn his conviction and death sentence based on evidence from a recently published study that he was more than five times more likely to be sentenced to death because of his race and the race of the victim in his case.
OHIO STATE
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TRENDING TOPICS
Malibu Times

Reviews & More: Wasted Talent

“Hit and Run" (Netflix) Gilbert and Sullivan wrote a song called “Things Are Seldom What They Seem” for one of their operettas, and so it is with this Israel/U.S. co-production, a nine-episode series. A happily married man, an Israeli tour guide, says goodbye to his wife who is on her way to New York to audition for a ballet company. Or is she? Did she ever get there? And what was she really doing there? We begin in Tel Aviv but events unfold that take us to the Big Apple and stay there. Everything we think we know is upended in this clever revenge scenario. We like our hero, we root for him, until we’re not sure we should or do like him; the happy marriage might not have been that happy… or even a marriage. There are secrets and espionage—we never know who to trust and it can get dizzying. Israeli actor Lior Raz (if you saw “Fauda,” another tension-filled Israeli import, you will remember him) does a fine job as a loving father who is also a violent hothead, driven to kill when his family is threatened. I do have one reservation about the series—there are too many sections that slow down and interrupt the fast pace. Its nine episodes could have been tightened to eight or even seven. But if dark and murky mystery series from other countries are a favorite of yours (as they are of mine), this one is worth watching.
TV & VIDEOS
Thrive Global

Jessica Norwood of RUNWAY: “Creativity ”

Creativity — It is your super power. Take creative dates. As a part of our series about “Why We Need More Women Founders”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Jessica Norwood. Jessica Norwood is the Founder of RUNWAY, a financial innovation firm that uses entrepreneurship as a strategy to close the wealth...
ECONOMY
San Francisco Examiner

You too, us too: There’s strength in numbers

This week’s question comes from Fatima from the Bay Area: I am a woman of color working at a big tech company in the Bay Area. I have been stuck in the same position for nearly seven years, while several of my white, male coworkers and even subordinates have been given opportunities for advancement. I’m worried my supervisor doesn’t consider me a serious candidate for a promotion, despite my excellent performance reviews. When there is a menial task to get done, it always seems to be assigned to me. At company events, my supervisor introduces me by first name only to corporate representatives, though he introduces the male members of my team using their full names. In meetings, I am frequently interrupted by male team members when I am trying to share feedback or ideas. I am hesitant to approach human resources about this. I feel I will be told I have no proof and I am just imagining things. I’ve heard rumors that women in other departments have had similar experiences, but I’m not sure who they are and I’m too worried about my job security to go asking questions. Do I have any options?
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
bloomberglaw.com

Whole Foods, Workers Debate Whether BLM Mask Ban About Job Bias

Workers say masks meant to also oppose race bias in workplace. Companies say just carried social message, job bias not mentioned. violated federal anti-bias law when they punished workers for wearing Black Lives Matter masks because it denied their rights to associate with and support Black colleagues, a group of employees told the First Circuit on Wednesday.
LABOR ISSUES
lawstreetmedia.com

Ex-CFO Sues New York Health Care Facility for Race Discrimination

According a lawsuit filed in Nassau County, New York, a woman has sued her former employer, Center for Comprehensive Health Practice (CCHP) for discrimination based on her national origin, race, and Asian ethnicity. Monday’s complaint seeks redress under New York State Human Rights Law for discrimination, retaliation, and wrongful termination.
NEW YORK CITY, NY
thenewsgod.com

Does the Paycheck Fairness Act Go Far Enough?

A couple of years ago, House Dems passed the Paycheck Fairness Act (PFA), which aims to make certain men and women are paid equally. The measure is also meant to shutter loopholes in the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which makes it mandatory that males and females get equal pay for equal work. Thanks to that legislation, companies may not use gender as a legit reason for pay gaps.
CONGRESS & COURTS
RFT (Riverfront Times)

Hartmann: Police-Chief Openings in St. Louis Won't Create a Stampede

The two top police-chief positions in the St. Louis area have just become vacant, and applications are now being accepted. In other employment news, window-washer jobs abound in hurricane country. And local companies are offering opportunities to handle radioactive materials with half-lives of 24,000 years. The most prestigious jobs in...
SAINT LOUIS, MO
BBC

Culture of bullying and racial discrimination found at NHS trust

A culture of bullying and racial discrimination has been found at a hospital trust, according to an inspection report. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) said there was a bullying culture across Nottingham University Hospitals (NUH) Trust, with many staff too frightened to speak up. The trust has been told it...
SOCIETY
lexblog.com

See You In Court – September 2021

The members of the Nutmeg Board of Education were frustrated with the low-energy, long-serving assistant superintendent, and they were delighted to receive a confidential email from Mr. Superintendent that the assistant superintendent had finally decided to move on. Veteran Board member Bob Bombast was right on it, emailing back to Mr. Superintendent that the Board would like to be “very involved” in the search for a new assistant superintendent.
LAW
Ahwatukee Foothills News

GOP pushback on vaccines may not fly, experts say

Gov. Doug Ducey says it’s illegal and “will never stand up in court.’’. Attorney General Mark Brnovich says it is taking “federal overreach to unheard of levels.’’. But attorneys who specialize in labor law say the decision by President Biden that large employers must have all workers vaccinated is well...
HEALTH
Hr Morning

Applicant fails test 9 times — then sues for race bias

A federal appeals court upheld a lower court’s disposition of a firefighter recruit’s claim of unlawful race discrimination. Firefighter recruits at the city of Toledo’s training academy have to pass a test involving cutting a hole in a roof with a chainsaw. The academy’s usual practice was to dismiss any...
POLITICS
nwlc.org

NWLC Files Amicus Brief Challenging Race-Based Discipline and Harassment: K.R. v. Duluth Public Schools Academy d/b/a/ Duluth Edison Charter Schools

On September 10, 2021, the National Women’s Law Center, along with our law firm partner Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, filed an amicus brief to the U.S. District of Minnesota, on behalf of 32 additional organizations, in support of three students represented by Nichols Kaster PLLP and Public Justice. The students include three Black and bi-racial children in Minnesota who claim they were frequently treated differently than white students, experienced ongoing race-based harassment, and were subject to a hostile learning environment at Duluth Edison Charter Schools (DECS), in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1963, and the Minnesota Human Rights Act.
EDUCATION
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