#Passwords

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Robocall bot goes after one-time passwords

We're all encouraged to use multi-factor authentication to protect our online accounts. Very often this involves a one-time passcode (OTP) sent via an SMS message. This makes life harder for the cybercriminals even if they have your password, but the team at CyberNews has uncovered a new robocall bot that aims to trick users into giving up their OTPs.
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Tom's Guide

How to share a Wi-Fi password

Want to know how to share a Wi-Fi password without slowly reading out the mess of letters and numbers that make up your default router password? Fortunately there are some much simpler methods built into the world's most popular phones. Apple users can feel particularly smug as iPhones and iPads...
TechnologyThe LastPass Blog

Graduate to Better Password Security This School Year

While students clear their desks, fire up their laptops, and prepare for a new academic year, IT teams across K-12 and higher education are fast at work to ensure their schools are prepared to support an incoming class. Supporting students and faculty certainly looks different this year. On the heels...
Cell Phonesmaketecheasier.com

How to Sync Firefox Bookmarks, Tabs, History, and Passwords Across Devices

Firefox comes with a feature that allows you to sync your browsing data across multiple devices. This is very useful, especially if you use Firefox on different Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, or iOS devices. Here we show you how to sync Firefox bookmarks, tabs, history and passwords across all devices you are using.
Worldnewsreadonline.com

A virus stealing bank passwords appeared in Russia

A virus stealing bank passwords appeared in Russia. Owners of smartphones running Android operating system can become victims of hackers. Experts from the Dutch company ThreatFabric announced the emergence of the Vultur virus capable of stealing passwords and bank card data, according to Moskva 24. The virus records an image...
TechnologyNew York Post

This password manager and VPN bundle is on sale for just $21

Discover startups, services, products and more from our partner StackCommerce. NY Post may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links. Keeping your data private and your devices safe is important, but it’s more than likely you’re not taking some of the most simple steps you can to protect yourself. You don’t always know when someone has stolen your passwords or personal information until they’ve stolen them and it’s too late–and it might take some time to realize even then. But there are ways to secure your personal information and ensure that you’re keeping your information and your identity safe, and your privacy secure.
Computerstechviral.net

5 Best Tools To Crack Hard Disk Password (Latest Edition)

If we look back, we will find that technology has changed considerably over the past few years. Now, we are so dependent on computers and smartphones that a day without them looks dull and empty. Since everyone now has a personal computer or smartphone, internet-connected devices have become the prime target for hackers.
Softwaremarketresearchtelecast.com

Monday: TSMC contamination, password grab, Android Trojans & home office rules

A mild summer evening can be a pleasure and if there is also a grill scent, it smells pleasant, but the air is no longer pure. Chip manufacturer TSMC could have felt something like this, because they found impurities. This is not at all ideal for semiconductor production – a brief overview of the most important messages.
NFLjioforme.com

Wearable devices can use breathing patterns like passwords

Wearable electronic devices such as earphones and smartwatches are currently paired with smartphones and similar technologies via secure Bluetooth or Near Field Communication (NFC) links, but quickly and safely paired depending on how you breathe. It may be ringed. Jafar Pourbemany Cleveland State University and his colleagues have developed a...
Cell PhonesPosted by
TechRadar

Maybe don't use browsers to store your passwords

In addition to practicing poor password hygiene, relying on password managers built into the web browser was another security faux pas highlighted by a recent survey. Commissioned by access management vendor ThycoticCentrify, the survey noted that more than a third (35%) of the respondents admitted to relying on their web browser to store credentials on their personal and work devices.
ComputersCNET

Forgot your Mac password? Here's how you can get back in

I think it's safe to say we've all forgotten a password at some point. For online accounts, you can just click a few links, enter your email address, and then reset your password. But what happens when you forget the password to log into your Mac? After trying, then retrying the password you thought was correct, it's only natural to want to panic. But don't. Instead, take a deep breath. You're not permanently locked out. Apple knows that a forgotten password can be a personal hell, especially if you're working on a deadline. Because of that, MacOS includes a tool for this exact scenario.
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