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Across vast Muslim world, LGBTQ people remain marginalized

YOGYAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — On the outskirts of Yogyakarta, an Indonesian city that’s home to many universities, is a small boarding school with a mission that seems out of place in a nation with more Muslim citizens than any other. Its students are transgender women. It is a rare oasis of LGBTQ acceptance – not only in Indonesia, but across the far-flung Muslim world. Many Muslim nations criminalize gay sex — including World Cup host Qatar. LGBTQ people routinely are rejected by their families, denounced by Islamic authorities, hounded by security forces, and limited to clandestine social lives. Appeals for change from LGBTQ-friendly nations are routinely dismissed as unwarranted outside interference. Yogyakarta’s Al-Fatah Islamic school was founded 14 years ago by Shinta Ratri, a trans woman who struggled with self-doubts in her youth, wondering if her gender transition was sinful. She went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in biology, then devoted herself to enabling other trans women to study Islam. Initially, there were 20 students at the school, and now about 60 – many of them middle-aged.
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cnmnewz.com

Why Isn’t Homeland Security Monitoring A Muslim-Only Immigrant Shelter At The US Border?

In October, U.S. Border Patrol caught another nine border-crossing immigrants who were on the FBI’s terrorism watch list, adding to the already record-breaking 98 during the just-ended fiscal 2022 and 14 during the prior fiscal year. Those 121 suspected terrorist border crossings should strike President Joe Biden’s homeland security...
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MuslimMatters.org

Podcast: Rebellious Wives, Neglectful Husbands I Hadia Mubarak

In this episode of The MuslimMatters Podcast, Zainab bint Younus speaks to Hadia Mubarak, author of the new and fascinating book “Rebellious Wives, Neglectful Husbands: Controversies in Modern Qur’anic Commentaries.” From polygamy to nushooz and male darajah (degree/ privilege), Mubarak compares and contrasts the many different ways that Islamic exegetes (mufassiroon) conceptualized and discussed these contentious topics in the Qur’an. Most notably, she addresses the increasingly common claim that traditional tafseer scholars were monolithically misogynistic – and instead, sheds light on the detailed, thoughtful, and nuanced perspectives of tafseer scholars of both the past and the present.
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