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#Genetic Material

Den of Geek

Evil Season 2: Is the Evil Gene Part of Kristen’s DNA?

This Evil review contains spoilers. The supernatural investigative team at the center of Evil finally focuses its attention on the one almost-constant element in their probes: the clinic they believe is corrupting fertilized eggs. They believe RSM Fertility is a front for diabolical masters, working behind the scenes to bring about a dark future ruled by a malevolent generation of engineered children. The clinic has been helping women get pregnant for several years, and one of their first clients was Dr. Kristen Brouchard (Katja Herbers). She was so early in the fertility facility’s operations, the founding physician who was in charge “no longer works” there, according to the reception staff.
TV SERIES
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businessnewswales.com

UK’s Leading Role in Shaping Regulation for Genetic Technologies

A new report published by the Regulatory Horizons Council in September sets out how the UK could take a leading role in shaping regulation to allow innovative and safe products using genetic technologies to be commercialised. The Regulatory Horizons Council (RHC) is an independent expert committee that identifies the regulation...
U.K.
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TRENDING TOPICS
granthshala.com

Mother, 32, whose six-month-old was born with a genetic condition that means he can’t cry and has seizures says it’s so rare it doesn’t have a NAME – as she begs scientists to find a treatment for her ‘happy baby’

A mother is begging doctors to conduct more research into a treatment for her son’s genetic condition that is so rare it doesn’t have a name. Lucinda Andrews, 32, of Chatham, Kent, had baby Leo on March 5 at Medway Maritime Hospital after a normal pregnancy. Soon after he was...
News-Medical.net

Study uncovers five new genetic loci predisposing to atopic dermatitis

An international study led by the University of Oulu's researchers reports five new genetic loci predisposing to atopic dermatitis. Based on three extensive biobanks, the study helps to understand the pathogenic mechanisms behind the disease and may open up opportunities for developing new forms of treatment. Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema)...
MedicalXpress

New genetic loci predisposing to atopic dermatitis identified

An international study led by the University of Oulu's researchers reports five new genetic loci predisposing to atopic dermatitis. Based on three extensive biobanks, the study helps to understand the pathogenic mechanisms behind the disease and may open up opportunities for developing new forms of treatment. Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema)...
SCIENCE
substack.com

Indignity Vol. 1, No. 20: The nice kind of calipers.

SOME PEOPLE ARE smarter than other people; everyone knows this. And some people are not as smart as they think they are. Where these two propositions meet, there you will find the phrenologists—laboring through the generations to prove the first point, and invariably proving the second. The phrenologists don't like...
SCIENCE
Nature.com

A forward genetic screen identifies modifiers of rocaglate responsiveness

Rocaglates are a class of eukaryotic translation initiation inhibitors that are being explored as chemotherapeutic agents. They function by targeting eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4A, an RNA helicase critical for recruitment of the 40S ribosome (and associated factors) to mRNA templates. Rocaglates perturb eIF4A activity by imparting a gain-of-function activity to eIF4A and mediating clamping to RNA. To appreciate how rocaglates could best be enabled in the clinic, an understanding of resistance mechanisms is important, as this could inform on strategies to bypass such events as well as identify responsive tumor types. Here, we report on the results of a positive selection, ORFeome screen aimed at identifying cDNAs capable of conferring resistance to rocaglates. Two of the most potent modifiers of rocaglate response identified were the transcription factors FOXP3 and NR1I3, both of which have been implicated in ABCB1 regulation—the gene encoding P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Pgp has previously been implicated in conferring resistance to silvestrol, a naturally occurring rocaglate, and we show here that this extends to additional synthetic rocaglate derivatives. In addition, FOXP3 and NR1I3 impart a multi-drug resistant phenotype that is reversed upon inhibition of Pgp, suggesting a potential therapeutic combination strategy.
SCIENCE
survivethenews.com

Israel to conduct coronavirus genetic testing for travelers arriving at Ben Gurion Airport

Following a spike in Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) cases, Israel now plans to implement COVID-19 genetic scanning for inbound passengers. According to Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, travelers at the Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv will be the first ones to undergo this genetic screening. The move comes as Israel sees more COVID-19 cases among its vaccinated population because of the B16172 delta strain.
WORLD
MedicalXpress

We are less skeptical of genetic engineering than assumed

We often hear that Swiss consumers want their agriculture to be free from genetic engineering. But consumer acceptance of genetically modified crops is likely to be higher than the media leads us to believe, Angela Bearth says. The ban on growing genetically modified crops in Switzerland is set to expire...
AGRICULTURE
nanowerk.com

Grow and eat your own vaccines?

(Nanowerk News) The future of vaccines may look more like eating a salad than getting a shot in the arm. UC Riverside scientists are studying whether they can turn edible plants like lettuce into mRNA vaccine factories. Messenger RNA or mRNA technology, used in COVID-19 vaccines, works by teaching our...
AGRICULTURE
thebreakthrough.org

Blog: NGOs Propose Principles for the Responsible Governance of Gene Editing

Last month, a group of environmental, conservation, and consumer NGOs published principles for “responsible governance of gene editing in agriculture and the environment.” These principles are meant to be high level and to serve as “an invitation from our organizations to other stakeholders to join us in developing a governance framework for gene editing.”
AGRICULTURE
Nature.com

The LOVD3 platform: efficient genome-wide sharing of genetic variants

European Journal of Human Genetics (2021)Cite this article. Gene variant databases are the backbone of DNA-based diagnostics. These databases, also called Locus-Specific DataBases (LSDBs), store information on variants in the human genome and the observed phenotypic consequences. The largest collection of public databases uses the free, open-source LOVD software platform. To cope with the current demand for online databases, we have entirely redesigned the LOVD software. LOVD3 is genome-centered and can be used to store summary variant data, as well as full case-level data with information on individuals, phenotypes, screenings, and variants. While built on a standard core, the software is highly flexible and allows personalization to cope with the largely different demands of gene/disease database curators. LOVD3 follows current standards and includes tools to check variant descriptions, generate HTML files of reference sequences, predict the consequences of exon deletions/duplications on the reading frame, and link to genomic views in the different genomes browsers. It includes APIs to collect and submit data. The software is used by about 100 databases, of which 56 public LOVD instances are registered on our website and together contain 1,000,000,000 variant observations in 1,500,000 individuals. 42 LOVD instances share data with the federated LOVD data network containing 3,000,000 unique variants in 23,000 genes. This network can be queried directly, quickly identifying LOVD instances containing relevant information on a searched variant.
SOFTWARE
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