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#China moon rover cube

China's Yutu 2 rover spots cube-shaped 'mystery hut' on far side of the moon

China’s Yutu 2 rover has spotted a mystery object on the horizon while working its way across Von Kármán crater on the far side of the moon. Yutu 2 spotted a cube-shaped object on the horizon to the north and roughly 260 feet (80 meters) away in November during the mission's 36th lunar day, according to a Yutu 2 diary published by Our Space, a Chinese language science outreach channel affiliated with the China National Space Administration (CNSA).
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE
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New York Post

China sends lunar rover to investigate strange ‘hut’ on far side of moon

A Chinese lunar rover has been sent on a mission to investigate a mysterious cube-shaped object spotted on the dark side of the moon. The strange white object appears oddly geometric against the stark black horizon in images and prompted scientists from China’s Change 4 mission to send its Yutu 2 rover on a two- to three-month journey to check it out, according to Our Space.
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE
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China's lunar rover spots mysterious "hut" on far side of moon

China's Yutu 2 rover has spotted a mysterious object described as a "hut" or "house" on the far side of the moon, according to a recent log of the lunar rover's activities. Yutu 2 encountered the cube-shaped object while driving across the Von Kármán crater last month during the mission's 36th lunar day, according to a post published on "Our Space" — a Chinese media channel affiliated with the China National Space Administration — Space.com reported.
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE
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Smithonian

Chinese Rover Spots Weird, Large ‘Cube’ on the Moon

An intriguing cube-shaped object spotted on the far side of the moon has attracted the attention of scientists. China’s Yutu 2 rover captured images of the mystery structure from around 260 feet away while navigating across the Von Kármán crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the moon, reports Popular Science’s Margo Milanowski. Chinese scientists have already rerouted the rover to take a closer look, but it will take a few months for Yutu 2 to reach the bizarre lunar feature.
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE
theregister.com

LoRa to the Moon and back: Messages bounced off lunar surface using off-the-shelf hardware

A team of scientists has managed to bounce a LoRa message off the Moon, setting an impressive record of 730,360km for the furthest distance such a data message has travelled. While much of the technology was off-the-shelf (Semtech's LR1110 RF transceiver chip was used) the signal was amplified to 350w using the 25-metre dish of the Dwingeloo Radio Observatory in the Netherlands. The same dish and chip was used to receive the signal on its return from the Moon, just under two and a half seconds later.
ASTRONOMY

Havoc in Hawaii

Severe weather in Hawaii has brought flooding in streets and 8 inches of snow atop some summits. It's Tuesday's news.
HAWAII STATE
theregister.com

China to create workers' paradise for ride share drivers

China's Ministry of Transport, along with eight other agencies, has issued an edict that demands working conditions ride share operators provide for drivers must improve. The main thrust of the new document, titled "Opinions to Strengthen the Protection of the Rights and Interests of Workers in the New Mode of Transportation", is for operators to become more transparent and humane.
TRAFFIC

China's Chang'e 5 moon landing site finally has a name

The landing site for China's complex Chang'e 5 moon sample and return mission now has a name: Statio Tianchuan. Statio means a post or station in Latin and is also used in the formal name for NASA's Apollo 11 landing site, Statio Tranquillitatis; and Statio Tianhe, China's Chang’e 4 landing site on the far side of the moon. Tianchuan comes from a Chinese constellation name, which means ship sailing in the Milky Way. Tianchuan consists of nine bright stars in eastern part of the constellation Perseus.
ASTRONOMY
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