CreatorsPublishersAdvertisers

#Cell Division

nationalrighttolifenews.org

The Glory of our humanity begins with a single cell

That’s you and me at our first moment of existence. When the cell was first discovered (and named) by Robert Hooke in 1665, it was hailed as a major discovery. However it was initially thought to be just a cell wall containing a mass of some sort of undifferentiated protoplasm.
SCIENCE
Picture for The Glory of our humanity begins with a single cell
TRENDING TOPICS
irbbarcelona.org

Key element identified in stem cell division 
and embryo development

Section of the disrupted brain of mouse embryos in which augmin was inactivated. Blues staining labels all brain cells, red staining are stem cells expressing p53, yellow staining are dying stem cells, and green staining are neurons. Participants. Contact. The protein complex augmin is essential for the formation of mitotic...
CANCER
Nature.com

Inside the USCAP Journals

You have full access to this article via your institution. Characterizing aggressive development of Leydig cell tumors. Rizzo et al. explored the molecular distinctions between aggressive and nonaggressive testicular Leydig cell tumors (LCTs), a subset of sex-cord stromal tumors making up less than 3% of all testicular tumors. Approximately 90–95% of LCTs are indolent and easily cured; 5–10% have aggressive biology and metastatic potential. The group investigated the genetic landscape of each type, using next-generation DNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry with fumarate hydratase (FH) as a marker. FH inactivation was shown in 5 of 26 cases. CTNNB1 mutations or biallelic APC inactivation (both resulting in Wnt pathway activation) were shown in 9 of 23 cases, and copy number changes without recurrent mutations in 6 of 23 cases. Integrating these findings, they identified three distinct subgroups of aggressive LCTs, characterized by FH inactivation, Wnt pathway activation, and copy number changes without recurrent mutations, with Wnt pathway activation as a possible driver and potential target for therapeutic intervention.
CANCER

The first cells might have used temperature to divide – NovLink

Romain Attal, Laurent Schwartz. Thermally driven fission of protocells. Biophysical Journal, 2021; DOI: 10.1016/j.bpj.2021.08.020. “The initial motivation of our study was to identify the main forces driving cell division,” says the study author Romain Attal of Universcience. “This is important because cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell division. This is also important to understand the origin of life.”
SCIENCE
vnexplorer.net

The first cells might have used temperature to divide

A simple mechanism could underlie the growth and self-replication of protocells-putative ancestors of modern living cells-suggests a study publishing September 3 in Biophysical Journal. Protocells are vesicles bounded by a membrane bilayer and are potentially similar to the first unicellular common ancestor (FUCA). On the basis of relatively simple mathematical principles, the proposed model suggests that the main force driving protocell growth and reproduction is the temperature difference that occurs between the inside and outside of the cylindrical protocell as a result of inner chemical activity. “The initial motivation of our study was to identify the main forces driving cell division,” says the study author Romain Attal of Universcience. “This is important because cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell division. This is also important to understand the origin of life.”
SCIENCE
Phys.org

The first cells might have used temperature to divide

A simple mechanism could underlie the growth and self-replication of protocells—putative ancestors of modern living cells—suggests a study publishing September 3 in Biophysical Journal. Protocells are vesicles bounded by a membrane bilayer and are potentially similar to the first unicellular common ancestor (FUCA). On the basis of relatively simple mathematical principles, the proposed model suggests that the main force driving protocell growth and reproduction is the temperature difference that occurs between the inside and outside of the cylindrical protocell as a result of inner chemical activity.
SCIENCE
scitechdaily.com

Origin of Life: The First Cells Might Have Used Temperature To Divide

A simple mechanism could underlie the growth and self-replication of protocells—putative ancestors of modern living cells—suggests a study publishing today (September 3, 2021) in Biophysical Journal. Protocells are vesicles bounded by a membrane bilayer and are potentially similar to the first unicellular common ancestor (FUCA). On the basis of relatively simple mathematical principles, the proposed model suggests that the main force driving protocell growth and reproduction is the temperature difference that occurs between the inside and outside of the cylindrical protocell as a result of inner chemical activity.
SCIENCE
technologynetworks.com

In the Absence of DNA, Did Heat Cause the First Cells To Divide?

Without genetic material, how did the earliest cells divide? A new theoretical model proposed by researchers at the Palais de la Découverte in Paris suggests that heat might have been the driving force. The study is published in Biophysical Journal. . Regulated cell division is important. The cells of your...
SCIENCE
News-Medical.net

Temperature variations could have driven the division of protocells

A simple mechanism could underlie the growth and self-replication of protocells-;putative ancestors of modern living cells-;suggests a study publishing September 3 in Biophysical Journal. Protocells are vesicles bounded by a membrane bilayer and are potentially similar to the first unicellular common ancestor (FUCA). On the basis of relatively simple mathematical principles, the proposed model suggests that the main force driving protocell growth and reproduction is the temperature difference that occurs between the inside and outside of the cylindrical protocell as a result of inner chemical activity.
CANCER
Cosmos

Hot single (cells) in your (ancient) area!

One simple factor could have made all the difference to cells on the ancient Earth: temperature. A new computational model from French researchers suggests that the reproduction of very early protocells may have been primarily driven by a temperature difference occurring between the inside and outside of the cell. “The...
CANCER
scienmag.com

Understanding a nanomuscle

Cells in the human body constantly receive substances from the outside via a process called endocytosis. One important endocytosis pathway involves the formation of a protrusion within the cell membrane, pointing to the inside of the cell, triggered when a molecule needing to get in reaches the membrane. The protrusion wraps and closes around the molecule, after which it is cut off, leaving the wrapped molecule (a so-called vesicle) inside the cell. A key role in the cutting-off mechanism is played by dynamin, a protein that can locally ‘constrict’ cell membranes, and chop off bits. The precise constriction mechanism is not completely understood, however. Now, by combining experiments and simulations probing the dynamics of dynamin, Alexander Mikhailov from Kanazawa University and colleagues show that the workings of such a ‘nanomuscle’ resembles that of a ratchet motor.
SCIENCE
Phys.org

Researchers find lagging chromosomes to be among the causes of infertility

Why do women over 35 have more difficulty getting pregnant? After discovering one of the causes of age-related female infertility, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) suggest that it will be possible in the future to improve the quality of the eggs of older patients by intervening on the cell cycle level.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
News-Medical.net

Study discovers lagging chromosomes as one of the major causes of infertility

Why do women over 35 have more difficulty getting pregnant? After discovering one of the causes of age-related female infertility, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) suggest that it will be possible in the future to improve the quality of the eggs of older patients by intervening on the cell cycle level.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE