#Black Music

Musicdailyrindblog.com

J. Erving Named 2021 Billboard R&B Hip-Hop Power Player

The annual Billboard R&B Hip-Hop Power Player list recognizes leaders in the field that continue to push the genre and culture forward. We’re happy to congratulate J. Eriving – founder of Human Re Sources and EVP of Creative Development for Sony Music Entertainment/EVP at The Orchard – on being named a power player! We also want to extend a sincere congratulations to The Orchard’s newly appointed Director of Artist Services Jade Lewin on also being named an R&B Hip-Hop Power Player for her previous work at Facebook.
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Nashville, TNTennessee Tribune

NMAAM Expands its Mission, Names First Black Woman as Board Chair

NASHVILLE, TN — The National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM) has announced the addition of seven new board members, new leadership under Stacey Garrett Koju, a museum-affiliated State of Black Music podcast and a. partnership with Blanx, an artisan footwear brand that tells a story on every shoe. As...
Musicmixmag.net

Saffron announces new artist programme for Black women and gender minorities

Saffron Records has announced a new Artist Development Project for Black women, non-binary people, trans and gender non-conforming music creators in South West England. The personal development programme has six spaces and aims to equip each participant with tools, opportunities and support to progress their careers in music. Read this...
Visual ArtBBC

DJ Derek: Mural celebrates legend of Bristol's music scene

Street artists have painted a mural celebrating the life of a legendary figure of a city's music scene. The design is in tribute to Derek Serpell-Morris, known as DJ Derek, who began his career as a reggae DJ in Bristol in 1970. He left his job as an accountant to...
allaboutjazz.com

Summer Of Soul (...Or, When The Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

Summer Of Soul (...Or, When The Revolution Could Not Be Televised) One of the most thought-provoking moments in Ahmir 'Questlove' Thompson's documentary on the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival comes from a festival attendee, looking back from the distant perspective of half a century. "I had never seen so many black people before," he recalls, still awestruck, all these years later, at the memory of 50,000 black people gathered in Mount Morris Park, Harlem, to enjoy the best of black music.
MusicWashington City Paper

The Newly Announced NEXTFest Ties Together D.C.’s Rich Musical Heritage

A newly announced music festival taking place at Malcolm X Park next month will use the evolution of Black music in D.C. as a lens to examine how the events of recent years—from the pandemic to social justice movements to the ongoing changes in the city’s demographics—will shape D.C.’s musical and cultural landscape in the years to come. Using jazz and go-go as a launchpad, the all-day NEXTFest, scheduled for Sept. 25, will feature music, art installations, panel discussions, workshops, and family entertainment.
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American Songwriter

Review: Never Heard Of Specialty Records? Let This Short But Potent Compilation Be Your Introduction

The Specialty label out of Southern California may not have recorded the first rock and roll music, but they were inarguably a major factor in its popularity. After all, if it wasn’t for artists on their roster such as Little Richard, Larry Williams, Roy Milton, Lloyd Price, and others, there may never have been an Elvis or Beatles. The latter might have made less of an initial impression if McCartney hadn’t “borrowed” Richards’ “woo-hoo-hoo” shout and guttural vocal style for their early work.
Musictreblezine.com

5 Albums That Wouldn’t Exist Without Funkadelic’s Maggot Brain

Jimi Hendrix died on September 18, 1970. Maggot Brain, the optimum amalgam of Blackness put to record, dove deeper into the pool of funk, blues, rock, gospel, metal, soul, fuzz and pop he presented to the world, maybe a bit too early for mass consumption when it arrived less than a year after Hendrix’s death. Remember, Jimi Hendrix was the only artist who asked to be a part of The Harlem Cultural Festival. And he was rejected.
MoviesHouston Chronicle

Showtime drops trailer for Rick James documentary, 'Bitchin': the Sound and Fury'

Showtime has released a trailer for “Bitchin’: the Sound and Fury of Rick James,” a new documentary directed by Emmy-nominee and hip-hop journalist Sacha Jenkins (“Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men”). Judging by the trailer the doc aims to present an accurate look at one of the most controversial and confrontational figures in the history of R&B and popular music.
Musicfreenews.today

Aaliyah’s Music Will Finally Be Streaming. What Took So Long?

For years, it has been one of music’s most conspicuous, and puzzling, absences: The majority of the catalog of Aaliyah, the groundbreaking R&B singer of the 1990s and early 2000s, has been absent from digital services — rendering the work of one of the most influential pop stars in recent decades largely invisible, and depriving her of a proper legacy. The singer, whose full name was Aaliyah Haughton, died in a plane crash in 2001 at age 22.
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Variety

Showtime Drops Trailer for Rick James Documentary, ‘Bitchin’: the Sound and Fury’

Showtime has released a trailer for “Bitchin’: the Sound and Fury of Rick James,” a new documentary directed by Emmy-nominee and hip-hop journalist Sacha Jenkins (“Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men”). Judging by the trailer the doc aims to present an accurate look at one of the most controversial and confrontational figures in the history of R&B and popular music. James, who died in 2004, is known for his 1980s hits like “Super Freak” and “Give It to Me”; his prison term for a sexual misconduct; and of course Dave Chappelle’s famous parody. Yet as documented in the trailer, his confrontational nature —...
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