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A huge, kilometer-wide asteroid will pass by Earth today

(CNN) — An asteroid estimated to be around a kilometer (3,451 feet) wide will fly by Earth on Tuesday. It will pass within 1.2 million miles of our planet, moving at 47,344 miles per hour (76,193 kilometers per hour), according to NASA's Center for Near Earth Object Studies, which tracks potentially hazardous comets and asteroids that could collide with our planet.
ASTRONOMY
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NASA

Radar Observations of Asteroid 4660 Nereus

These images and animation represent NASA radar observations of 4660 Nereus on Dec. 10, 2021, before the asteroid's close approach on Dec. 11, when it came within 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) of Earth. Using the 70-meter radio antenna at the Deep Space Network's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California, scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory acquired the most detailed radar images of the nearly 1,100-foot-wide (330-meter-wide) near-Earth asteroid since its discovery almost four decades earlier. Nereus' orbit is very well known and the asteroid does not pose a threat to Earth.
ASTRONOMY
NASA

10 Things to Watch for in Planetary Science for 2022

Deploying a new space telescope; deflecting an asteroid with a spacecraft; and visiting a metal-rich asteroid. These items and more are on NASA’s 2022 calendar. The new James Webb Space Telescope delivers its first images in June. 2. Psyche: Mission to a Metal-Rich Asteroid. Launching in August 2022, NASA’s...
ASTRONOMY
scitechdaily.com

Don’t Look Up: Several Asteroids Are Heading Towards Earth – Dealing With Real-Life Threats to Our Planet

Don’t look now – but we are currently experiencing a rash of stories about a forthcoming global catastrophe. But in a change from reports of pandemics and climate change, this global catastrophe is produced by the impact of a giant asteroid. Or comet. Or both. This may feel extra ominous given the events in the recent Netflix film “Don’t Look Up,” in which the Earth is threatened by a “planet killer” asteroid.
ASTRONOMY
KQED

Thousands of Asteroids Orbit Near Earth. NASA's Next-Gen Spotter Helps Protect Us

Of NASA’s many launches, those with a fiery blastoff and a gleaming aerial ascent into space get the most love from space fans — but not all missions fly on rockets. Take Sentry II. It's not a spacecraft or even a ground-based telescope. It’s a computer algorithm designed to forecast future asteroid near-misses and collisions with Earth. To do that, it must search through mountains of asteroid orbital data collected by many observatories. In December, NASA launched Sentry II on its mission.
ASTRONOMY
Astronomy.com

How prepared is Earth for an asteroid collision?

Contrary to what you may have read, Earth will not be devastated by the asteroid Apophis on April 13, 2029. Neither will Bennu, a 1/3-mile-wide pile of flying space rubble, strike us on Sept. 24, 2182. Every single scare story out there warning of an impending celestial collision is just that, a scary tale. At the same time, it is inevitable that such an impact will eventually occur — and when it does, the event could generate vast firestorms, tsunamis and extinctions.
ASTRONOMY
nbcboston.com

Asteroid of ‘Potentially Hazardous' Size Makes Safe Flyby Past Earth

A massive and "potentially hazardous" asteroid whizzed safely by Earth on Tuesday, traveling at over 43,000 miles per hour. The kilometer-wide asteroid, named 1994 PC1 (7482), is roughly the length of 10 football fields. And while classified as dangerous due to its sheer size and relatively close flyby, NASA had "rest assured" 1994 PC1 it would safely pass Earth 1.2 million miles away.
ASTRONOMY
scitechdaily.com

NASA Asteroid Watch: Keeping an Eye on Near-Earth Objects

Managed for NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) accurately characterizes the orbits of all known near-Earth objects, predicts their close approaches with Earth, and makes comprehensive impact hazard assessments in support of the agency’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
ASTRONOMY
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