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#Armyworm

Cedar Valley Daily Times

Managing fall armyworm: Extension agronomist breaks it down

Fall armyworms have recently become a serious pest throughout much of Northeast Iowa, says area field agronomist Joshua Michel with Iowa State University Extension. Typically, fall armyworms fly in from the south on warm air currents. But weather conditions have converged to worsen the issue. “Warmer and dryer than average...
IOWA STATE
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Sentinel-Echo

Brown lawns could mean fall armyworm damage

This is one of the worst years on record for fall armyworms as a pest in home lawns, and specifically cool-season grasses. Normally, fall armyworms are a pest in agriculture crops, or feed on warm-season grasses, such as bermudagrass on golf courses. We are not used to seeing them in cool-season lawns like they are this year. Lawns started turning brown practically overnight and can look very brown and dead.
AGRICULTURE
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TRENDING TOPICS
farms.com

Fall Armyworm Still Active in Some Fields

Despite the cold snap a couple of weeks ago, we have continued to catch large numbers of fall armyworm moths (we caught >10,000 moths the last week of September), have found eggs, and have even had reports of damage in cover crops, alfalfa and other forage. The good news is that the extent of the damage is less than we saw during late August and early September. However, the continued warmth over the next week or so may allow fall armyworm caterpillars to do a bit more feeding until the first frost. We recommend to scout all alfalfa, forage, cover crops, winter wheat and other crops that still may be risk from fall armyworm feeding.
AGRICULTURE
whvoradio.com

Another Round Of Fall Armyworms Possible?

Fall armyworm has been as unpredictable as it was devastating to field, pastures, and lawns across Kentucky. The Fall armyworm has continued to lay eggs, and we were expecting to have yet another generation of larvae. However, with the cooler weather, development was slowed compared to what we had last month. University of Kentucky’s Extension Entomologist, Jonathan Larson that we may have turned the corner on the Armyworm invasion.
ANIMALS
farms.com

Fall Armyworm: Keep Looking

What a ride! This fall armyworm infestation has been unprecedented and likely (for me), a once in a career experience. Not to say this infestation has been an extremely high with over-the-top damaging population but rather one that has caused some economic problems in several cropping situation and certainly caused a lot of attention.
AGRICULTURE
York News-Times

Jenny's Reesources: Army worms, planting small grains and other insect problems

• Nov. 8: Young, Beginning, Small Farmer Symposium, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., UNL East Campus Union, https://ianr.unl.edu/young-beginner-and-small-farmer-symposium. • Nov. 12: Dr. Temple Grandin-Kids and Dreams Foundation: Understanding Animal Behavior, 10 a.m., Buffalo Co. Fairgrounds, Kearney. • Nov. 16: Cover Crop Grazing Field Day, 9 a.m. registration, ENREC near Mead. • Nov....
YORK, NE
backroadsnews.com

Armyworms taking aim at fields

Kansas State University crop entomologist Jeff Whitworth said many Kansas farmers are reporting sightings of the small worm, which feeds on turf grasses, vegetables and other plants when other food sources become scarce. “It has been 14 or 15 years since we’ve gotten this many reports and seen this much...
KANSAS STATE
northwestmoinfo.com

Fall Armyworms Marching Through Pastures & Lawns

(Radio Iowa) The Iowa State University Extension Service is getting reports of a pest that’s damaging hay fields, pastures and even some lawns. Gentry Sorenson, an I-S-U Extension field agronomist based in northwest Iowa, says it’s a caterpillar known as the fall armyworm. “The fall armyworm basically blew up as...
IOWA STATE
1230kfjb.com

Armyworm Marching Through Fields

The Iowa State University Extension Service is receiving more reports of a pest that’s damaging hay fields, pastures and even some lawns. Gentry Sorenson, an I-S-U Extension field agronomist says the fall armyworm can grow to be up to an inch and a half long. Sorenson says farmers can use an insecticide if the bugs are causing a lot of damage.
IOWA STATE
ournaijanews.com

FG approves genetically modified maize for open cultivation

The Federal Government has approved the environmental release and open cultivation of ‘Tela’ Maize, a new maize variety developed by researchers at the Institute for Agricultural Research (IAR), Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. This was contained in a joint statement issued by Alex Abutu, Communications Officer, African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF),...
INDUSTRY
totallandscapecare.com

An unexpected invasion: Fall armyworms emerge at unprecedented levels

In the past, it has not been uncommon to see fall armyworms in Southern and Southwestern states. But in 2021, this destructive caterpillar has been attacking at what some experts are calling an “unprecedented level.” Not only are states that are used to dealing with this occasional pest seeing more full-blown infestations, but regions that have never dealt with them before are seeing problems.
ANIMALS
Radio Iowa

Fall armyworm marching, munching through Iowa fields, lawns

The Iowa State University Extension Service is getting reports of a pest that’s damaging hay fields, pastures and even some lawns. Gentry Sorenson, an ISU Extension field agronomist based in northwest Iowa, says it’s a caterpillar known as the fall armyworm. “The fall armyworm basically blew up as a moth...
IOWA STATE
youragedge.com

Stinkbug Numbers Higher This Fall In Kentucky

This seems to be the year for pests in our part of the world. First it was the cicada invasion in some parts of Kentucky. Then there was the overabundance of flies and mosquitoes caused by the wet weather. Not to be outdone was the armyworm invasion that destroyed fields and lawns in some spots. Now our newest invader is the brown marmorated stink bug.
KENTUCKY STATE
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