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#Alaska Senate

Anchorage Daily News

Investing in Alaska is a strong vote for our future

Alaska needs infrastructure, investment and jobs to help us address the serious challenges we face. Climate change is affecting everything from our roads and bridges to our economy and families. Erosion is threatening whole communities and thawing permafrost is undermining critical infrastructure across our state. Energy transitions and dynamic markets are demanding innovation and job creation in new, cleaner energy sources. The fish, game and subsistence resources that Alaskans depend upon are changing migration patterns, shrinking or disappearing altogether, threatening the very fabric of our families and cultures.
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themudflats.net

GOP “leadership” & Alaska’s COVID catastrophe

Welp. Another special session has come to a close, with the legislature settling on an $1100 PFD – pretty much the same as we’ve had for years and no thanks to the governor who could have had this outcome long ago, but in an interesting choice vetoed the PFD down to nothing, and started the process all over again. It was actually a nail-biter for a second and it looked like Alaskans might have no PFD at ALL. But we drove back from the edge of that cliff. There will be no veto this time, but before you think that means we’re done here – ANOTHER special session has been called for October 1. Someone should tell the governor that if he keeps calling special sessions, nobody is going to think they’re very special.
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alaskareporter.com

Kelly Tshibaka scores Durling, Hyde, leading business owners, as campaign co-chairs

Kevin Durling and Ron Hyde, two longtime Alaska business entrepreneurs, joined the Kelly Tshibaka for Senate campaign as co-chairs, the campaign announced today. Anchorage resident Kevin Durling is a 44-year resident of Alaska and owner of two businesses supporting diverse aspects of Alaska’s economy. His life in Alaska began in the field of resource development as a subsurface survey manager and service representative in Prudhoe Bay.
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TRENDING TOPICS
SFGate

Housing in Alaska can't survive climate change. This group is trying a new model.

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE, Alaska - Francis Waskey's house used to stand four feet above ground on wooden stilts. Now, the mud underneath it has swallowed them whole. As the posts sank over the years into the thawing, carbon-rich frozen soil known as permafrost, Waskey tried propping up the 28-by-36-foot wooden structure with two empty propane tanks, to no avail. The ground shifted so much that the vinyl floor split apart. Nails popped out of the floorboards. The windows shattered, leaving Waskey - a Yupik native who grew up in the home with his family and remained after his parents passed - with icy drafts through subzero winters.
Delta Discovery

Norton Sound area rivers, Yukon, Kuskokwim River Salmon – More specifically Kings and Chums

My Name is Steven Alexie, Lifelong Kuskokwim river resident and subsistence user. I am writing to you concerning our salmon stocks on the Norton sounds area rivers, Kuskokwim and more specifically Yukon river in its entirety. The residents of these areas have been experiencing declination of the much relied on salmon for many years.
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

State crime report is mostly welcome news

News-Miner opinion: The Department of Public Safety’s Crime in Alaska report for 2020 contained some great news for the state: There was a reduction in crime across Alaska in most categories last year. Reports from 32 of the state’s police agencies showed Alaska’s overall crime rate dropped 18.5%, continuing a...
Washington Post

Trump aims to inject more extreme election conspiracy theorists into GOP

Early this year, the Republican Party had its best opportunity to date to turn the page on Trumpism. But after the outrage over a Capitol riot by Trump supporters subsided, the party — even those who had criticized President Donald Trump over it — largely dropped the matter. In fact, they went on to fight the creation of a bipartisan commission to investigate the situation and even ousted a party leader, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), who called out Trump’s bogus voter-fraud claims.
Anchorage Daily News

Alaska will greatly benefit from historic infrastructure bill

Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus grade. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still-young state is deficient in water and wastewater, ports and harbors, marine transportation, energy and power infrastructure, and more. Even in our highest-graded areas — like roads and airports — Alaska still has plenty of room for improvement.
ALASKA STATE
Ketchikan Daily News

Redistricting group weighing six legislative map proposals

The Alaska Redistricting Board on Tuesday approved a final roster of six new proposals for redrawing the state's legislative districts that the board will use in setting a redistricting plan for the next 10 years. Each of the approved maps — two drawn by board members, four submitted by third-party...
keycodemedia.com

KTOO 360TV Control Room & PTZ Camera System Upgrade Prepares for the Future and Saves Station During COVID

KTOO 360TV Control Room & PTZ Camera System Upgrade Prepares for the Future and Saves Station During COVID. KTOO 360TV is a full-time public TV channel based in Juneau, Alaska, broadcasting coverage of government proceedings from the Alaska State Capitol, located a quarter-mile from the station. Gavel Alaska is one of KTOO’s flagship TV programs with live and recorded coverage of committee meetings, Alaska senate, and house floor sessions, press conferences, and other legislative events. Alaska is a geographically very spread out state, so broadcasting government proceedings to the public is a critical role for KTOO. When legislators solicit testimony on a bill, participants will call in via telephone to participate in the proceedings from remote communities, while watching on television via cable, satellite, and via a network of TV transmitters in almost 200 small communities across the state.
Homer News

Dividend payments expected in 30 days

Alaskans can expect to see their Permanent Fund Dividends in about 30 days following Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s announcement he will not veto a bill allocating $1,100 for the payments. Brian Fechter, deputy commissioner at the Department of Revenue, said in an email the PFD division was working as fast as...
Homer News

Hitting the road: Redistricting maps to be shown in local hearings

The Alaska Redistricting Board is taking six proposals for reshaping the state’s electoral map on the road in a series of public meetings meant to garner public feedback. The board’s first draft proposals were met with criticism from a variety of groups including Democratic lawmakers, Alaska Native corporations and watchdog groups, and new proposals have been drafted.
midnightsunak.com

Redistricting Board approves all but Democratic Party’s plan for roadshow

The Alaska Redistricting Board will be taking six different proposals on the road ahead of its November deadline to redraw Alaska’s election district maps, but a proposal submitted by the Alaska Democratic Party will not be among them. At its Monday meeting, the Alaska Redistricting Board adopted updated versions of...
alaskapublic.org

Alaska Redistricting Board’s first drafts draw criticism and alternate plans

Every 10 years, states redraw their political district maps to keep them up-to-date with shifts in population, as reflected in the census. In Alaska, a five-member redistricting board draws the map. And where the board draws the lines will have big implications on who gets elected. The process kicked off...
Juneau Empire

Hitting the road: Redistricting maps to be shown in local hearings

The Alaska Redistricting Board is taking six proposals for reshaping the state’s electoral map on the road in a series of public meetings meant to garner public feedback. The board’s first draft proposals were met with criticism from a variety of groups including Democratic lawmakers, Alaska Native corporations and watchdog groups and new proposals have been drafted.
Anchorage Press

Oh, God. More of the same?

This week brought the end of the third special session of the year and a bit of maneuvering by the House and Senate Finance Committee made sure the Legislature had something to show for the last 30 days. By holding the budget to the final day of the special session and canceling the day’s House floor session, the two effectively cut off any last-minute attempt in the Senate to boost the PFD above the $1,100 level. For all governor’s attempts at leveraging and browbeating the Legislature into passing a larger dividend, turns out it’s still pretty hard to get one over on Senate Finance Committee co-chair Sen. Bert Stedman and company. But that doesn’t mean the governor can’t keep trying. Before the third special session was even technically over, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced a fourth special session with little detail except for it’ll be about “an act or acts related to a fiscal plan” and to “get the rest” of the large dividend he promised all the way back in 2018.