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Rare shark shown walking in video

sharks in the waterPhoto by Ibrahim Rifath (Unsplash) When you think of sharks, you probably think of great white sharks or maybe a tiger shark from a movie. Or maybe you went on vacation and even saw a small shark at a fishing pier. But there is a completely different kind of shark out there: some incredible footage of a walking shark has surfaced.
RELATED CONTRIBUTORS
Phys.org

Methane satellites find landfills with the same climate impact as several hundred thousand cars

Methane is almost thirty times more powerful as a greenhouse gas than CO2. Researchers from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research therefore scan the entire globe for large methane leaks. A landfill in Buenos Aires turns out to emit tens of tons of methane per hour, comparable to the climate impact of one and a half million cars. They also detect large emissions from landfills in India and Pakistan, identifying new low-hanging fruit in the battle against climate change. The work was published on August 10 in Science Advances.
INDUSTRY
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Phys.org

Math error: A new study overturns 100-year-old understanding of color perception

A new study corrects an important error in the 3D mathematical space developed by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger and others, and used by scientists and industry for more than 100 years to describe how your eye distinguishes one color from another. The research has the potential to boost scientific data visualizations, improve TVs and recalibrate the textile and paint industries.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
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Scientists’ theory about the universe before the big bang may have a fatal flaw

A scientific theory that attempts to explain what existence was like prior to the big bang may have a fatal flaw.Some theorists have suggested that the universe expands and contracts in endless cycles. This would mean that the universe has no beginning nor end, but instead grows towards the future and shrinks towards the past.While this theory is appealing because it means there is no need for time to have a ‘beginning’, new research suggests that this ‘bouncing’ universe model may not be accurate.“People proposed bouncing universes to make the universe infinite into the past, but what we show is...
ASTRONOMY

New warning that collapse of Antarctica ‘sleeping giant’ could raise sea level more than 16ft

The collapse of Antarctica’s “sleeping giant” could cause planetary-scale change in the coming centuries, according to a new warning from scientists. If the climate crisis continues on its current trajectory, then melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) alone could contribute around 3-10 feet (1-3metres) of sea-level rise by 2300, and 7-16.4ft (2-5m) by 2500. The research, by an international team of scientists, was published on Wednesday in the academic journal Nature.The team points out that this potentially catastrophic outcome of global heating could be avoided if the world meets the goals of the 2015 Paris Agreement. Nearly...
ENVIRONMENT
natureworldnews.com

Vanilla Vader: New Species Found to Resemble Darth Vader from the 'Star Wars' Franchise

Darth Vader from the "Star Wars" franchise will probably meet his look-alike after a study led by scientists from Taiwan found a new species that resembles the image of the Sith, an ancient order and the main antagonists in the franchise. The species has been nicknamed "vanilla Vader" by Live Science and scientists call it Bathynomus yucatanensis.
WILDLIFE
Digital Trends

Scientists just achieved a breakthrough in quantum computing

A research team from the Japanese Institute for Molecular Science has now made a great stride in quantum computing, making it happen with the help of a two-qubit gate. A qubit is the quantum equivalent of a binary bit, which is a basic unit of information used in computing. The...
COMPUTERS
Phys.org

Researchers decipher ancient chemistry formulas

Researchers have identified the ingredients in chemistry formulas from an 2,300-year-old Chinese text, revealing ancient metallurgy was more complex than expected. The Kaogong ji was written in China around the middle of the first millennium BC and is the oldest known technical encyclopedia. It details items ranging from swords to musical instruments and how to make them, including six chemistry formulas for mixing the bronze.
CHEMISTRY