Sacramento News & Review

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Sacramento News & Review

Analysis: graft and disaffection hits California’s state workers union

Jonah Paul is a member of SEIU Local 1000 and veteran housing advocate in Sacramento. This analysis first appeared on Strike Wave. Rejecting the status quo and reformer factions, members of California’s state workers union, SEIU Local 1000, elected an anti-political firebrand named Richard Lewis “RL” Brown last month. Brown is known to many members for Trump-esque social media diatribes, cyber-bullying, and a strange mix of populist and conservative politics. The repercussions of his election for labor and California politics could be dire, and Brown may have broken the rules to win.
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Sacramento News & Review

The Crocker comeback: Art’s inspiring appeal on full display as the city’s historic museum comes back to life

Kids’ summer camps, ‘Louis Comfort Tiffany’ exhibit & ‘For America’ showing all on the horizon. Sacramento’s dedicated art community leaned on virtual experiences to connect with audiences during a time when in-person entertainment just wasn’t safe. For the Crocker Art Museum, virtual gallery tours, online painting classes and even quick art-of-the-day posts on social media became creative outlets for those stuck at home, as well as the docents and stewards of art history based at the museum.
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Sacramento News & Review

For those about to ska, Carnes defends you

Sacramento writer sees attention, promising sales around his unlikely pitch for a maligned musical genre. Joyful horns, bass and guitars flowed from speakers and echoed by murals paying tribute to musical art through images of vinyl records, bouncing notes and colorful graffiti tags. As a small crowd gathered in the sunshine outside Phono Select Records, journalist and author Aaron Carnes was ready to make his case for those blasting sounds – and ready to explain why he’d penned his new book “In Defense of Ska.”
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Sacramento News & Review

How the canna-toys held up

SN&R’s cannabis writer re-reviews four of his past cannabis equipment purchases. This is my 150th cannabis article for the Sacramento News and Review. In the last five years, I have written about several interesting new cannabis inventions and devices. Now seems like a great time to take a second look...
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Sacramento News & Review

Greenlight: Is The Bee failing to report the misdeeds of its hedge fund bosses?

On June 1, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, Politico and other news organizations reported on the consequences of trying to kill a story: American Media, the parent company of The National Enquirer, agreed to fork over $187,500 to the Federal Election Commission to settle accusations it provided $150,000 in hush money to a former Playboy model to kill her story about an affair with Donald Trump.
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Sacramento News & Review

Essay: Sacramentans’ incomes are being used for a new form of red-lining – and our leaders have let it happen

The way things are going, what chance do working people have as renters?. Riddle me this: When is a house not a home? The answer: When it doesn’t belong to you. That’s because renting has become an endeavor so risky in Sacramento that it’s difficult for a resident to know if they have a home-sweet home, or temporary living arrangement. In a city where more than half of the population are renters, those who lease are treated like a minority— and, ironically, most renters are people of color, holding down multiple jobs to make ends meet, which is poignant for a city claiming to be investing in equity and inclusive economic development.
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Sacramento News & Review

Rally at state capitol aimed at stopping deportation of Vietnamese war refugee

Controversial Trump-era strategy carries over to the Biden administration. As a small child, Lam Hong Le watched as war engulfed his home and ravaged the surrounding communities of central Vietnam. He spent a year living in a Hong Kong refugee camp before getting sponsored to come to California. What should have been a new start became its own kind of hell, as Le found himself isolated in an abusive home and then alone on the streets as a runaway. He was sent to prison when he was 24, where he spent the next three decades of his life learning to become a different person.
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Sacramento News & Review

Protecting Sacramento’s gardens from the relentless heat

This month will be a trial by heat for many Sacramento transplants. That goes for tomato seedlings as well as newcomers. So far, Sacramento has managed to stay under the 100-degree mark in 2021. But with the coming weeks we’re going to see some scorchers. Never mind that we’ve been comfortably in the low 80s, even 70s. High temperatures on Sunday and Monday will be 20 degrees hotter than a week ago.
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Sacramento News & Review

Editorial: Lost moment at the state capitol offers a window onto ‘the person sitting in darkness’

Sometimes our present woes are best understood through the pain others felt in the past. For 45 years May has been the month of the frog at California’s state capitol. Prior to the pandemic, lawmakers, legislative staff and infamous scribblers would always gather on the East Lawn to watch burly Calaveras bullfrogs make their incredible jumps.
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Sacramento News & Review

As kids and young people hurry to get vaccinated, the Sacramento region remains a patchwork of strategies

Four-year universities are mandating vaccinations, but community college and public schools don’t see that as an option. On May 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved Pfizer and BioNTech’s Covid-19 vaccine for children 12 to 15. Just three days later, hundreds of teens and their parents funneled through the inflatable nighthawk arches at the front of Natomas High School to get their shot.