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Mental HealthPosted by
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Teletherapy Boosts Access to Mental Health but Not for People of Color

For years, medical professionals have been touting telemedicine as a means of expanding access to health care by saving patients time, removing physical barriers, and making it easier to connect with providers. But data show that over the past year, when teletherapy should have been having a renaissance, many barriers to access to care persist, especially for people of color, Time reports.
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CNN Anchor Christiane Amanpour Announces Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

Renowned CNN journalist Christiane Amanpour, the television network’s chief international anchor, has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, she revealed on Monday during the opening moments of her evening news show, Amanpour and Company. Describing the experience as a “bit of a roller coaster,” the British-Iranian journalist spent only a minute or so on the topic before turning her attention to the subject matter that has defined her career: international tension and conflict.
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Addressing HIV Stigma in the HIV Workplace

Ending the HIV epidemic in America starts with addressing HIV stigma in the HIV workplace. NMAC believes the best way to create real change is by building partnerships between people living with HIV (PLHIV) and their Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) service providers. Thanks to funding from HRSA-HAB, NMAC put together this new stigma reduction program with three different learning modalities: 1) trainings, 2) technical assistance, and 3) learning collaboratives in a program called ESCALATE (Ending Stigma through Collaboration and Lifting all to Empowerment). Click here to find out how to register. Participants can only register if they are part of a team that includes a PLWH and their RWHAP service provider.
New York City, NYPosted by
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Most People With Cancer Respond Well to COVID-19 Vaccines

Most cancer patients with solid tumors had good antibody responses after receiving COVID-19 vaccines, but the response rate was lower for those with blood cancers, such as leukemia or lymphoma, according to study findings published in Cancer Cell. People with severe immune suppression, including cancer patients who use immune-suppressing therapy...
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Women Drinking More to Cope, Alarming Researchers

Once indulged in mostly by men, alcohol has become increasingly popular among women. In fact, a 2019 survey found that females in their teens and 20s imbibed more often than their male peers, according to NPR. However, the phenomenon is not exactly a win for gender equality. Not only does...
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Federal Government Updates HIV Treatment Guidelines

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) this month released revised guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy and prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections. The updates reflect the effectiveness of modern treatment but acknowledge that challenges remain for some people living with HIV. Key changes to the Guidelines...
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Life Span of People With HIV in Latin America Continues to Lengthen

Life expectancy for people living with HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean grew substantially between 2003 and 2017, according to data published in The Lancet HIV. The study looked retrospectively at HIV treatment for people who were at least 16 years old between January 2003 and December 2017, focusing on data from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico and Peru.
Mental HealthPosted by
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Racial Violence Damages Black People’s Mental Health

In the past few months, media coverage of racism, discrimination and anti-Black violence in the United States has escalated. Now, new findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggest that increasing awareness of these issues might come at a cost, especially for Black viewers, Scientific American reports.
PharmaceuticalsPosted by
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Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine 90% Effective in U.S. Trial

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine from Novavax proved highly effective in a large trial in North America, offering a potential new tool for combatting the coronavirus pandemic. While authorization of the vaccine will come too late for it to play much of a role in the United States, it is expected to make an important contribution to global vaccine access.
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FDA Approves Controversial Alzheimer’s Treatment

On June 7, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval of Aduhelm (aducanumab), the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly two decades. More than 6 million people in the United States are living with the progressive brain disease, a number that is expected to rise as the population ages. While advocates for people with Alzheimer’s applauded the approval, others say the drug’s effectiveness is modest at best and its cost is excessive.
Columbus, OHPosted by
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You Are Valued and Important

My name is Tracy Lamar Johnson Jr. I was born in Orlando. I relocated to Columbus, Ohio, when I was 12 years old. At age 14, I ran away from home because I got tired of the physical, mental and verbal abuse. During this time, I was homeless. I was eating out of trash cans, and I started selling my body. On August 15, 2005, I found out that I was HIV positive. I didn’t know what HIV was, but I tried to commit suicide several times because I thought I was worthless and didn’t have anything to offer to the world.
Public HealthPosted by
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Little-Known Illnesses Turning Up in COVID Long-Haulers

The day Dr. Elizabeth Dawson was diagnosed with COVID -19 in October, she awoke feeling as if she had a bad hangover. Four months later she tested negative for the virus, but her symptoms have only worsened. Dawson is among what one doctor called “waves and waves” of “long-haul” COVID...
Diseases & TreatmentsPosted by
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FDA Approves Two Hepatitis C Treatments for Younger Children

On June 10, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) extended its approval of. Epclusa (sofosbuvir/velpatasvir) and Mavyret (glecaprevir/pibrentasvir) for the treatment of hepatitis C in children ages 3 and older. Both combination pills are effective against all genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is uncommon among children, affecting...