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Diseases & TreatmentsPosted by
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FDA Approves Two Hepatitis C Treatments for Younger Children

On June 10, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) extended its approval of. Epclusa (sofosbuvir/velpatasvir) and Mavyret (glecaprevir/pibrentasvir) for the treatment of hepatitis C in children ages 3 and older. Both combination pills are effective against all genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is uncommon among children, affecting...
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DiabetesPosted by
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Honor International NASH Day 2021—Your Liver Will Thank You!

Thursday, June 10, is International NASH Day 2021 (#NASHday). It’s a chance to raise global awareness about non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is a more severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), itself a type of hepatitis. Hepatitis simply means inflammation of the liver. There are many forms of hepatitis...
ReligionPosted by
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Blessed by God

I’ve been living with this devil since 2001, but I’m doing great. I just started taking medication and am doing good. By the grace of God, I’m blessed. To live long to help other people living with HIV. We can make it. What is your greatest regret?. Having this devil...
POTUSPosted by
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The U.S. Finally Has a New AIDS Czar!

AIDS advocates nationwide are congratulating Harold Phillips on his appointment by President Joe Biden as the new director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP). An official announcement is pending, but that hasn’t delayed the showering of praise on social media from leaders in the world of HIV/AIDS and public health.
SciencePosted by
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How COVID-19 Variants Evade Immune Response

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, uses a protein called the spike protein to recognize and enter host cells. Recent SARS-CoV-2 variants contain changes, or mutations, at a key site on the spike protein called the receptor-binding site (RBS). Some of these mutations render antibodies elicited against earlier virus strains...
New York City, NYPosted by
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Sharing My Experience, Strength and Hope

In 2003, I had a terrible cough deep down in my chest. I thought it was bronchitis, so I stopped smoking. I was tested for pneumonia but was told the chest X-ray was negative. I was given antibiotics and sent home. On my 40th birthday, I got up, and my family sang “Happy Birthday” and gave me a cake, and then I went back to bed. A few days later, I was in the hospital, diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). I was asked if I wanted to take an HIV test. Later, a doctor’s assistant came in to check my vitals and stopped at the door and turned around to say, “By the way, your test came back positive” and then left me all alone! I was devastated!
HealthPosted by
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We Must Rededicate Ourselves

Forty years ago today, five young men in Los Angeles were confirmed as the first known patients stricken with an illness that the world would later come to know as AIDS. In the decades since, more than 700,000 Americans and 32.7 million people worldwide have been lost to AIDS-related illnesses – a heartbreaking human toll that has disproportionately devastated LGBTQ+ communities, communities of color, and underserved and marginalized people around the world.
New York City, NYPosted by
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HIV at 40: Amazing Advances but Challenges Remain

On June 5, 1981, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Report (MMWR) published the first report of AIDS, describing five cases of unusual Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) among previously healthy young gay men in Los Angeles. On July 1, his first day on the job, Paul Volberding,...
AdvocacyPosted by
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HIV Long-Term Survivors Awareness Day 2021

Saturday, June 5, is HIV Long-Term Survivors Awareness Day (HLTSAD) 2021. The date also marks “the 40th anniversary of the start of the AIDS pandemic,” as HLTSAD organizers put it. For this reason, this year’s HLTSAD theme is “AIDS at 40: Envisioning a Future We Never Imagined.”. On June 5,...
SciencePosted by
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Two Viruses, One Lifetime: How HIV Prepared Me for COVID-19

COVID-19 is the second pandemic that I’ve lived through and I’m only 58 years old. Ever since I was diagnosed with HIV in 1982, I’ve been an HIV activist. When COVID-19 emerged last year, like so many others, my advocacy switched gears and all the energy I had spent decades devoting to HIV was poured into raising awareness about this new virus and how to stop it.
HealthPosted by
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40 Years in and 10.2 Million People With HIV Still Aren’t on Treatment

It’s been 40 years since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ran its first report of an immune illness that would later be known as AIDS. Today, the broad rollout of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment regardless of CD4 count means that 27.4 million of the 37.6 million people living with HIV have access to lifesaving care.
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R.I.P. Marco Castro-Bojorquez, Human Rights Advocate and Filmmaker

Marco Castro-Bojorquez, a human rights advocate and filmmaker, has died. The news of his passing was shared June 2 on social media. The details of his death are not yet confirmed. Castro-Bojorquez’s death was met with not only sadness but surprise. He had recently returned to the United States from...
HealthPosted by
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I Am Not a Victim

At the age of 45, I was diagnosed with HIV. At first, I was told I had syphilis, so I wasn’t that worried. I contracted syphilis in 1996, and during my time in the military, I contracted gonorrhea and chlamydia. For five years before my diagnosis, I was getting tested for HIV every three months. When I walked through the doors of the clinic, there was this feeling of bad energy. I began to prepare myself for the worst. I was scared while I was waiting; the room had a dark aura. The doctor walked into the room and told me my results came back positive. After hearing that, I dealt with my fear. I felt the weight of life and death. I made the decision to live, even though I thought I was going to die.