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William Randolph Hearst

wvxu.org

How William Randolph Hearst Still Influences Media Today

William Randolph Hearst, America's first media mogul who died 70 years ago, still influences media today. "He was this tremendous force that transformed America's media landscape," said Stephen Ives, a writer-director on PBS' "Citizen Hearst" documentary premiering 9 p.m. Monday on American Experience on WCET-TV, Dayton's WPTD-TV, Covington's WCVN-TV and KET.
CINCINNATI, OH
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Raleigh News & Observer

What to Watch Monday: New documentary series focuses on William Randolph Hearst

Citizen Hearst (9 p.m., PBS NC) - This new American Experience miniseries traces the rise of William Randolph Hearst, who built the nation’s largest media empire by the 1930s. Hearst, the model for Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane,” controlled a vast media empire, wielded unprecedented power and influence, and forever transformed the media’s role in American life and politics. Part 2 airs tomorrow night and follows Hearst’s expansion into Hollywood and romance with actress Marion Davies. (On a related note: TCM has “Citizen Kane” tonight at 8.)
TV & VIDEOS
Culpeper Star Exponent

Media tycoon William Randolph Hearst had Virginia roots

Among news-media titans, Rupert Murdock and his sons are probably better known these days. But in the 20th century, William Randolph Hearst was the most famous, ambitious and outrageous American publishing tycoon. An innovator whose daring takes one’s breath away, Hearst created the media landscape we know today, with its...
VIRGINIA STATE
ABQJournal

PBS docuseries looks at the life of media mogul William Randolph Hearst

William Randolph Hearst was one of the most powerful men of the 20th century. By the 1930s, Hearst controlled the largest media empire in the country – 28 newspapers, a movie studio, a syndicated wire service, radio stations and 13 magazines. He used his communications stronghold to achieve political power...
TV & VIDEOS
Richmond.com

Media tycoon William Randolph Hearst had Virginia roots

Among news-media titans, Rupert Murdock and his sons are probably better known these days. But in the 20th century, William Randolph Hearst was the most famous, ambitious and outrageous American publishing tycoon. An innovator whose daring takes one’s breath away, Hearst created the media landscape we know today, with its...
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San Francisco Chronicle

How William Randolph Hearst remade struggling S.F. Examiner into prestige paper

On March 4, 1887, a new name appeared atop the masthead of the San Francisco Daily Examiner: “W.R. Hearst, proprietor.”. Few people noticed. With a circulation of 15,000, the Examiner was the weakest of the city’s three main newspapers, trailing both The San Francisco Chronicle (circulation 37,500) and the San Francisco Call, which claimed to have twice the circulation of The Chronicle. The only Democratic paper in the city, the Examiner had been losing money for years. In 1880, a rough-edged, semi-literate mining magnate named George Hearst bought it to support his bid for the U.S. Senate. Hearst was elected senator in 1887, but the Examiner remained on life support. Now preoccupied with politics, George Hearst decided to give his son and only child, William Randolph Hearst, a shot at publishing the moribund daily.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
pbs.org

William Randolph Hearst and McCarthyism

William Randolph Hearst was nearly on his deathbed on February 9, 1950 when a little known junior senator from Wisconsin named Joseph McCarthy announced during a routine political speech to a group of Republican women in Wheeling, West Virginia, that he held in his hand a list of 205 Communists in the State Department. Over the next few days the numbers fluctuated. Was it 57 reds? Or 81? The names and numbers didn’t matter. It was the boldness of his charges and their supposed specificity that threw the Democratic administration into a tizzy and made McCarthy so notorious that his name became synonymous with the longest and most widespread episode of political repression in American history.
U.S. POLITICS
pbs.org

When the Newsies Took on William Randolph Hearst

William Randolph Hearst wanted to go to war, and he wanted to go in style. In 1895, his newspapers began calling for the United States to bring an end to Spanish occupation of Cuba. When, in April 1898, Congress passed a joint resolution authorizing President McKinley to use force on the island, Hearst had rockets set off from the roof of the building of his newspaper, the New York Journal. Hearst arranged to go to Cuba himself and had a boat refitted to meet his standards for travel south. The steamer was loaded with darkrooms, printing presses and medical supplies; it was also equipped with huge quantities of ice, his favorite foods and chefs to cook it. The Journal splurged on its war coverage as well. The paper sent special correspondents to Cuba and to the war’s second front in the Philippines, published extra wartime editions and ran contests with large money prizes for its readers.
NEW YORK CITY, NY
Montgomery News

Of All Things: Tales of William Randolph Hearst

Tomorrow is the date in 1863 that William Randolph Hearst was born. Most folks may not remember him now, but he was a big force in American journalism, and a flashy millionaire. His father, George Hearst, was a miner who struck gold, and became a United States senator and a...
BOOKS & LITERATURE
CharlotteObserver.com

Iconic Beverly Hills mansion owned by William Randolph Hearst back on market for $90M

The famous mansion once known as the Beverly House and owned by newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst is back on the market for $90 million. The house’s return to the market comes in the middle of bankruptcy proceedings, according to The Wall Street Journal. The estate’s current owner, Leonard Ross, has tried to unload the property since 2007 and even used a “crowdfunding platform” to refinance the iconic mansion, The WSJ reported.
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