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Warsan Shire

Poet Warsan Shire on Her Debut Collection, Working with Beyoncé, and Why She’s Done with Shame

All products featured on Vogue are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission. More than five years after a credit on Beyoncé’s Lemonade made her a literary star, British-Somali writer Warsan Shire’s Bless the Daughter Raised by a Voice in Her Head has cemented her status as the voice of a generation. Below, she speaks with Vogue about the power to be found in disappearing, her unusual writing process, and why she’s done with feeling shame about past traumas.
Picture for Poet Warsan Shire on Her Debut Collection, Working with Beyoncé, and Why She’s Done with Shame
NPR

Poet Warsan Shire hopes you can make the voices in your head your friends

Somali British poet Warsan Shire has had many projects, including running a popular Tumblr page and collaborating with Beyoncé. Now, she is out with a new collection of poems called Bless The Daughter Raised By A Voice In Her Head. That title is an ode to how she was raised, having to take on a lot of responsibility from a young age. But Shire told NPR's Sarah McCammon that it's also an ode to the children who are able to turn those voices into their friends instead of struggling with them as she has.
Picture for Poet Warsan Shire hopes you can make the voices in your head your friends

‘Lemonade’ Poet, Warsan Shire: ‘Poetry Was Always Linked to My Mental Health’

British-Somali poet, Warsan Shire, became a global name overnight after Beyoncé’s 2016 visual album “Lemonade,” was released. Shire is credited with “film adaptation and poetry” on the album and she has also collaborated with the megastar on Beyoncé’s 2020 film “Black is King.” On a more personal note, Shire was the hired pen behind Bey’s “I Have Three Hearts,” 2017 pregnancy announcement.
Picture for ‘Lemonade’ Poet, Warsan Shire: ‘Poetry Was Always Linked to My Mental Health’