Voltaire

Boats & Watercraftsheavyliftpfi.com

Keel laid for Voltaire

The keel has been laid for Jan De Nul’s offshore jack-up installation vessel Voltaire at the Cosco Shipping Shipyard in Nantong, China. The steel was cut for the vessel in May 2020, as HLPFI reported here. The 3,000-tonne lifting capacity vessel will be equipped with a 3,000-tonne capacity main crane,...
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Books & LiteraturePosted by
TheConversationAU

Guide to the Classics: Voltaire’s Candide — a darkly satirical tale of human folly in times of crisis

“Italy had its renaissance, Germany its reformation, France had Voltaire”, the historian Will Durant once commented. Born François-Marie Arouet, Voltaire (1694-1778) was known in his lifetime as the “patriarch” of the French enlightenment. A man of extraordinary energy and abilities, he produced some 100 volumes of poetry, fiction, theatre, biblical and literary criticism, history and philosophy. Among his myriad works, Voltaire’s Candide, or Optimism (1759) is widely recognised as the masterpiece. A darkly satirical novella taking aim at human folly, pride and excessive faith in reason’s ability to plumb the deepest metaphysical truths, it remains as telling in this era...
PoliticsPosted by
The Independent

Voltaire and Rousseau wrestled with the subject of ‘free speech’ but ultimately fell short – so what hope does Gavin Williamson have?

Gavin Williamson knows what it’s like to be a victim of “cancel culture”. He is, after all, the only cabinet minister ever to be cancelled live on air, by Richard Madeley, in a safari park, to the gentle bemusement of a nearby semi-rampant elephant.It’s easy to laugh at Gavin Williamson. Indeed it’s very hard to do anything else. But pause we must from that activity, albeit very briefly indeed, to examine the great man’s latest adventures, this time on to the precarious intellectual terrain of free speech.“Ideas in themselves are not worthy of respect, only tolerance – and to thrive...
Visual Arttheartnewspaper.com

Walter Benjamin, Voltaire and Mozart: art historian Arturo Galansino on his cultural influences

If you could live with just one work of art, what would it be?. Very difficult question! I could pick up a different painting every day for the rest of my life... Today I would choose Whistlejacket (1762) by George Stubbs, one of my favourite paintings in the National Gallery in London. It is an unprecedented full-scale portrait of a rearing chestnut thoroughbred, represented with incredible realism against a plain background. It is like a painted equestrian monument celebrating a racehorse champion and the horse itself. It is an extremely modern image. The large format and its flat background, like a Japanese print, are just unique for animal painting: a revolution in the hierarchy of artistic genres and a romantic celebration of energy and nature. As an equestrian, I would love to have a similar painting of my favourite horse.
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EducationWatertown Public Opinion

Lenore Skenazy column — Voltaire was right (about elementary school pickup procedures)

You may recall the saga of the South Carolina mom who granted her kids — 9, 10 and 11 — permission to walk the mile home from school together, without her. School officials refused to release them to do this, on the grounds that a nearby intersection (with walk/don’t walk signals) is too dangerous. This particular mom’s kids happen to cross it at other times, unaccompanied, on their way to and from extracurriculars.
Books & Literaturethebulwark.com

The Origins of a Warning from Voltaire

“Anyone who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.”. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about that famous quote, ordinarily attributed to Voltaire. When I brought up the quote on Twitter the other day, I was taken aback when a reader challenged its authenticity, citing this French-language Swiss source in which a Voltaire biographer writes it off as an internet myth. Had I, along with hundreds of others, gotten the origin of “absurdities . . . atrocities” wrong? Misattribution of famous quotes is rife online, after all, very much including the better-known line attributed to Voltaire, “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” That most excellent maxim is best described as a paraphrase (rather than a translation) of the French philosopher’s views as rendered by English writer Evelyn Beatrice Hall in 1906.
Educationcreators.com

Voltaire Was Right (About Elementary School Pickup Procedures)

You may recall the saga of the South Carolina mom who granted her kids — 9, 10 and 11 — permission to walk the mile home from school together, without her. School officials refused to release them to do this, on the grounds that a nearby intersection (with walk/don't walk signals) is too dangerous. This particular mom's kids happen to cross it at other times, unaccompanied, on their way to and from extracurriculars.
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