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Vic Spencer

Listen to Vic Spencer and Small Professor’s “Pitfall Music” [ft. Flee Lord and DJ Revolution]: The Ones

Content This content can also be viewed on the site it originates from. Vic Spencer’s releases often feel like detritus from a bygone era, marked by intense dedication to lyrical ingenuity and the use of dusty samples ripped from record bins. His latest release with Philly producer Small Professor is no different: “Pitfall Music” could have soundtracked a winter subway ride in 1997. The tone is set by Flee Lord’s grimy snarls (“When we pull up to your city/all your shooters come and greet us”) and DJ Revolution’s ghostly threats over vinyl scratches on the chorus (“Stepping to me would be a fatal mistake”). Meanwhile, Vic Spencer spits lines that are like a jab to the nose. “I feel for every heartfelt nigga that is stuck with you,” he raps, over a knocking drum beat. Pray for the subject of these veterans’ ire.
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Vic Spencer and Small Professor Unite for 'Mudslide'

After sharing a handful of singles, the duo of Vic Spencer and Philly producer Small Professor returns with their full-length collaboration titled Mudslide. The 10-track body of work is released under Coalmine Records and it marks Small Pro's third collaborative release on the label after he previously linked with Guilty Simpson and the late Sean Price. The producer adds that this new project continues his style of modern-day boom-bap style with his own twisted edge.
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CHICAGO READER

Chicago rapper Vic Spencer sticks to his ideals on Spencer for Higher 4

Chicago rapper Vic Spencer has built a catalog worthy of a book-length exposition, but for the time being I’ll restrict myself to a handful of observations about December’s Spencer for Higher 4 (Old Fart Luggage). One: UK rapper-producer Sonnyjim, who had a hand in every beat on the album, employs sumptuous sonics that help even Spencer’s most petulant turns go down easy and give his voluble verses a lived-in resplendence. Two: Spencer sometimes sounds like he’s dragging his raps across sandpaper, a gritty affectation that gives his declarative statements an iron backbone. On “GS3 Pt. 4,” he puts it more succinctly: “I got the voice of a leader.” Three: A harmless feud can be fun, especially if it produces the kind of amusingly twisted verses Spencer rolls out on “Ex Biggest Supporters.” Four: Spencer demands a lot from his comrades in hip-hop, but that doesn’t make him a hypocrite. He clearly demands just as much from himself, and I’m sure he’ll keep holding himself to underground hip-hop’s highest ideals on his next album too.
CHICAGO, IL
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