Sebastian Junger

Books & LiteratureAPG of Wisconsin

The Bookworm Sez: "Freedom" by Sebastian Junger

Your front door opens to the world. It's the threshhold of a journey, one of a few feet or a few years, a trip that you'll never take exactly the same again. Open the door and see what's out there. Open it because you can, and step out. You have the freedom to go anywhere – or, as author Sebastian Junger asks in his new book, "Freedom" – do you?
Picture for The Bookworm Sez: "Freedom" by Sebastian Junger
Books & Literaturekeizertimes.com

Book review: "Freedom" by Sebastian Junger

Your front door opens to the world. It's the threshhold of a journey, one of a few feet or a few years, a trip that you'll never take exactly the same again. Open the door and see what's out there. Open it because you can, and step out. You have the freedom to go anywhere – or, as author Sebastian Junger asks in his new book, "Freedom" – do you?
Picture for Book review: "Freedom" by Sebastian Junger
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Books & Literaturesandiegouniontribune.com

Walking the line: Sebastian Junger in search of ‘Freedom’

In new book, Sebastian Junger walks hundreds of miles in hopes of finding ‘Freedom’. Pandemic life has put an emphasis on freedom. Whether it was in the form of disgruntled anti-maskers complaining about their right being violated, or it was the cautiously quarantined longing for a return to better times, the past year has laid bare our often divergent ideas of what it means to be free.
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Harrisburg, PAPosted by
outsidemagazine

Sebastian Junger on Walking America’s Railroads

The change was immediate. The country opened up west of Harrisburg and suddenly we could drink from streams and build fires without getting caught and sleep pretty much anywhere we wanted. We’d walked the railroad tracks from Washington to Baltimore to Philly and then turned west at the Main Line and made Amish country by winter. The Pennsylvania fields lay bare and hard in the cold but there were seams and folds in that country—strips of woods along stream bottoms, windbreaks between the cornfields, ridges left wild for hunting—where a man could easily pass the night unnoticed. Once, we cooked dinner on a steep hill above the town of Christiana and went to sleep in a snowstorm listening to the clatter of carriage horses on the street below. At dawn we walked into town for pancakes and coffee and then headed on up the railroad tracks before anyone whose job it was to stop us even knew we’d been there.
Books & Literaturewamc.org

Sebastian Junger Probes Nature Of Human "Freedom"

Author, journalist and filmmaker Sebastian Junger has long been attracted to extremes. In his new book “Freedom,” Junger uses a months-long hike he and some friends took along the railroad tracks in the mid-Atlantic a few years ago as a frame to discuss autonomy, community, violence and what freedom really means.
Books & LiteratureThe Ringer

Masks Off. Now What? Plus, Sebastian Junger on His New Book.

Bryan Curtis and David Shoemaker discuss the new CDC guidelines that state fully vaccinated people can stop wearing masks in most situations. They touch on the impact the new guidelines have had, and weigh in on this new phase of the pandemic (4:42). Later, Sebastian Junger joins to talk about his new book, Freedom, and his journey to uncover what the word “freedom” really means (29:13). Plus, the Overworked Twitter Joke of the Week and David Shoemaker Guesses the Strained-Pun Headline.
Books & LiteraturePosted by
Los Angeles Times

Sebastian Junger coped with loss by taking a long walk to ‘Freedom’

Wanderlust can manifest in a variety of literary forms. One is the narrative of the “long walk,” which dates back to the Bible and up to recent works like Rory Stewart’s “The Places in Between.” It popped up in David Morrell’s 1972 thriller “First Blood,” in which a Vietnam veteran known only by the name Rambo has trouble reintegrating into American society and decides to travel the country until he finally comes to a dramatic confrontation with police in Kentucky (in the novel) or Washington state (in the better-known Sylvester Stallone movie adaptation).
EntertainmentOutside Online

Sebastian Junger

Ian Frazier, Sebastian Junger, Jon Billman, Ronald Kral, Roland Merullo, Mary Roach, and Joe Kane. The world wants them to stop, but it's the trade of their grandfathers. With a harpoon and their wits, they ply the waters of the Caribbean in search of their 40-ton prey. And when they're gone, it all goes with them.