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Sarah Ramos

Actress Sarah Ramos on her L.A. Art Show, ‘Autograph Hound’

Click here to read the full article. Sarah Ramos is presenting a retrospective, “Autograph Hound.” “I’m really excited about it, because I feel like I have so many different projects…with the internet, everything can feel really fractured, and I’m excited to present them as being thematically similar,” said the actress.More from WWDInside Burberry's L.A. Party, Celebrating the Lola BagBurberry Hosts Dinner With Bella Hadid, Jacob Elordi, Lori HarveyArt-Inspired Makeup Looks by Mimi Choi It’s an art show showcasing elements of her life, playing with her image, her person and persona. Though she’s just 30 years old, she’s been in the business for...
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flaunt.com

Sarah Ramos | AUTOGRAPH HOUND: A RETROSPECTIVE

On Friday, April 8th, THNK1994 Museum and Junior High Los Angeles hosted an event celebrating Sarah Ramos, whose works throughout her two-decade career like Winning Time and Parenthood explore the dimensions of fame. Guests such as Dylan O’Brien, Logan Lerman, Camila Mendes, Shira Haas, Rosa Salazar, Delante Desouza, Lars Gummer, Olivia Sui and Peter and Kathryn Gallagher drank Brother’s Bond bourbon and posed with cutouts of Zendaya, Rihanna and Timothée Chalamet. The multimedia event allowed guests to view photos from her titular “Autograph Hound” collection, watch videos from her web series “City Girl” and “Quaranscenes,” and listen to her true-crime podcast “The Renner Files.”
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Refinery29

Hey Mike White, Sarah Ramos Wants To Audition For White Lotus Again

Soon after its July premiere, The White Lotus became the show of the summer. Creator and showrunner Mike White’s HBO project had layers, much like Tanya, played by Jennifer Coolidge (and Shrek). It touched on colonialism, imperialism, white privilege, pretty privilege, the one percent, and the sense of fantasy that vacations, especially ones at the esteemed White Lotus hotel, give visitors. Refreshing, upsetting, and not without its blind spots, the six-episode limited series delivered a concise, incisive tragic story about a set of unlikable, but extremely watchable characters while commenting on the plight of going against — and then succumbing to — The (White) Man.