Robert Plant

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Robert Plant turned to music in lockdown

Robert Plant admits music helped keep him grounded during the pandemic. Robert Plant says music kept him sane during lockdown. The Led Zeppelin legend has opened up on how he turned to music to help him through the pandemic, although he didn't have any set artists or songs which he'd always listen to.
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How Robert Plant Reacted to Dolly Parton Covering Led Zeppelin’s Most Famous Song

So you’re gonna cover a Led Zeppelin song. Maybe you’d pick a ballad like “Going to California” or “That’s the Way.” Those tracks eliminate the need for electric guitar virtuosity, allowing you to evade Jimmy Page comparisons. Or maybe you try a stomper like “Trampled Under Foot.” But under no circumstances would you pick “Stairway to Heaven,” would you?
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Robert Plant: Writing Like Bob Dylan Is More Than I Can Imagine

Robert Plant expressed awe at songwriters who were able to “voice somebody else’s condition” in their lyrics, saying the concept was beyond his imagination. In the latest episode of his Digging Deep podcast, the Led Zeppelin legend singled out Bob Dylan as a prime example of writers with such an ability, heaping praise on the singer-songwriter’s latest album, 2020's Rough and Rowdy Ways.
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Robert Plant Told Nancy Wilson That He Has Negative Feelings About Stairway To Heaven

While there are countless cover versions of Led Zeppelin’s musical masterpiece Stairway to Heaven, it’s undeniable that Heart’s performance at the Kennedy Center in 2012 is the only one that truly rivals the original. In that video, Heart got their stamp of approval especially since Robert Plant was visibly moved by their rendition – not an easy thing to accomplish, for sure.
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Robert Plant Wants His Personal Archives Released for Free After His Death

Robert Plant gave his children instructions to release his personal archives after his death. The tidbit comes from the most recent episode of his Digging Deep podcast. Plant told his co-host Matt Everitt that the lockdown gave him time to “put his house in order.”. “All the adventures that I’ve...
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Musicsocietyofrock.com

Robert Plant Shares His Inspiration To Start Singing

In a new interview published on The Guardian, Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant looked back at his childhood and teenage years. He also discussed the time when he realized his true passion. At the time, he was already obsessed with music. “One night, my schoolmates asked me to sing in their...
Musicsocietyofrock.com

Geddy Lee Shares Robert Plant Helped Rush In Their Darkest Time

In a new interview with Classic Rock magazine, Rush’s Geddy Lee discussed how Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant helped them during a dark period in the late 1990s. One phone call from Plant encouraged them and helped boost their confidence to push on. It was after drummer Neil Peart’s 19-year-old daughter Selena passed away in a car accident in August 1997. It resulted to an extended hiatus and at one point, they were uncertain they will play together again.
Musicsocietyofrock.com

Robert Plant Will Only Release Unheard Music After His Death

Kicking off the fourth season of his acclaimed Digging Deep podcast, Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant has revealed that he’s going to make his personal archive available for free after his death – most of which are previously unheard and unreleased songs. He told co-host and presenter co-host Matt Everitt that last year’s lockdown restrictions gave him enough time to “put my house in order.”
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Robert Plant Has Planned For Inevitable Posthumous Release Of His Archives

Robert Plant has combed through his vault of unreleased music and "itemized" the tracks in question that will be released following his death. The Led Zeppelin frontman said on the latest episode of his Digging Deep podcast that he's planned for the inevitable, understanding that — as with other famous musicians — everything he's ever recorded will likely come out once he's no longer around to stop it.