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Paul Demarco

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Paul DeMarco: Unpredictable U.S. Senate races in Alabama now the new normal

So the party primaries are over in Alabama and Katie Britt is now the Republican nominee for the United States Senate. We could say this race was one for the history books, but candidly so have the last three U.S. Senate elections in Alabama. It used to be that Senate contest came along rarely in Alabama, but the past five years have proven otherwise.
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Paul DeMarco: Alabama jobs numbers a bright spot for the state

Alabama’s unemployment rate just matched the lowest in the history of the state. At 2.9 percent, it tied the all-time record low reached in pre-pandemic 2019. This is an amazing statistic that other states wish they could duplicate and shows the efforts state and business leaders are making to return Alabama back to better economic times before the pandemic.
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Paul DeMarco: Alabama lawmakers side with liberal interest group over state public safety officials

Some lawmakers in the Alabama Legislature are again showing that their “law and order” campaign promises do not necessarily match their actions in the state capitol. This past week a bill being pushed by Alabama Appleseed that would weaken the state’s ability to suspend driver’s licenses for those who do not pay their traffic tickets passed the Alabama House Judiciary Committee. The Alabama Senate has already passed a version of this bill.
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PAUL DEMARCO: Combating mental obesity

The root cause of America’s obesity epidemic and the rise of political polarization are linked. The former is due to unhealthy food choices, the latter to unhealthy media ones. A side effect of living in a developed country where food and media are inexpensive and widely available is that we consume too much insalubrious types of both.
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PAUL DEMARCO: Why not Pence?

It’s a question I pose seriously to my fellow citizens who plan to vote for Donald Trump if he runs again. Let’s ignore the personalities for a moment and compare two theoretical candidates. We will stipulate that our two candidate’s policy positions are indistinguishable. Candidate A is a handsome, trim, 62-year-old former governor who has led a virtuous life. He has been married to a Midwestern schoolteacher for 36 years. He is so faithful that he will not dine alone with another woman to avoid the appearance of impropriety. He is a devout, Bible-believing Christian. He’s measured in his responses and disagrees agreeably. He has pets, including dogs, cats, and rabbits. Candidate B is a 75-year-old businessman who is not as handsome or trim. Even his most ardent supporters acknowledge he can be mean-spirited and crass. He has been thrice married and is alleged to have had several affairs. He has been recorded making profoundly misogynistic remarks. His business record is checkered. A number of his enterprises including an airline, a private university, a mortgage company, and multiple casinos have gone bankrupt. He’s one of only a few men to ever be featured on the cover of Playboy magazine. He has no pets.
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Paul DeMarco: Significant political implications for court order to redraw Alabama Congressional Districts

This past week a stunning ruling by a three-member panel of the United States 11th Circuit Court of Appeals blocked a redistricting plan drawn up by the Alabama Legislature. The Court ruled that the lawmakers now have until February 11th to draw up a new map that would create two Congressional Districts in Alabama that minority candidates could win in the upcoming 2022 elections.
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Paul DeMarco: Alabama Supreme Court approval of changes to bond law good news for public safety

Another week and more high-profile crime in the state of Alabama. A murder suspect in Mobile has now been arrested after being accused of shooting and killing his girlfriend. What makes this another sad broken record in Alabama is the murder suspect was out on bond for a separate murder charge when the new crime occurred. There have been so many of these tragic incidents it is hard to keep count.
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Paul DeMarco: 2021 A Difficult Year for Alabama, Hope for 2022

When we look back at this past year, there will be a lot of headlines that we will remember about this year in Alabama. Obviously, the pandemic and its effect on the state’s citizens is what we will remember most about 2021. The virus took its toll on Alabama with over 16,000 Alabamians who passed away and many more who suffered from infection with the virus. And state leaders debated on how best to move the state forward while the virus was spreading.
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Paul DeMarco: Legislation to address critical race theory in Alabama schools is coming in 2022

One of the most controversial issues this past year was the debate over critical race theory being taught in the Nation’s schools. Alabama parents were also part of the fight to keep this progressive agenda out of their K-12 schools as well. The Alabama State School Board addressed this issue earlier this year, but there is still concern there needs to be a stronger prohibition put into law.