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Pat Martino

thesciencesurvey.com

The Life and Music of Jazz Guitarist Pat Martino

Pat Martino was a world-class musician. Twice. By 1980, the 36 year-old had dozens of albums and collaborations under his belt. He was regarded as one of the best jazz guitarists on the planet. Then, Martino underwent a brain surgery. This caused him to lose most of his memory, and he completely forgetting how to play the guitar. In the face of these odds, Martino returned to his craft, falling in love with the instrument all over again. In 1987, Martino released ‘The Return,’ showing an undiminished greatness and kicking off the second chapter of his career. He went on to perform masterfully for decades longer.
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mtpr.org

Musician's Spotlight: Special Tribute To Pat Martino

"When the anesthesia wore off, I looked up hazily at my parents and his doctors. and tried to piece together any memory of my life.” Legendary jazz guitarist Pat Martino has been inspiring the musical community and beyond with his inventive playing style and resilient spirit which helped him overcome severe brain trauma, complete amnesia and the formidable challenge of relearning the instrument that he had mastered. This is a special tribute to Pat Martino who passed away November 1, 2021.
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jazztimes.com

Artist’s Choice: Russell Malone on Pat Martino

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is the first in a series of personal tributes to members of the jazz community whom we lost in 2021. We’ll be publishing the series on jazztimes.com over the next 10 days. Nineteen of the tributes can be found in print as part of our annual In Memoriam feature in the March 2022 issue; this is the twentieth, with which the print issue closes.
READING, PA
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knkx.org

Guitarist Pat Martino

Pat Martino began playing professionally at the age of 15 after moving to New York. For a time, he lived with Les Paul and then began playing regularly at jazz clubs. His career spanned six decades — starting with his formative years playing with a deep groove that he honed with various masters of the jazz organ, including Charles Earland, Don Patterson, Jack McDuff and, more recently, Joey DeFrancesco.
NEW YORK STATE
The Independent

Pat Martino: One of jazz music’s finest guitarists

By the age of 35, when Pat Martino learned that he might have only a few hours to live, he was already considered one of jazz music’s finest guitarists. He had developed a sleek and fluid style modelled after guitarist Wes Montgomery, having begun touring as a teenager, and became known for his bracing lines, freewheeling harmonies, and dexterity on the fretboard.

Jazz fans mourn passing of Pat Martino

Pat Martino, a renowned jazz guitarist from South Philadelphia, died last week in the same rowhouse where he grew up. He was 77. Martino had been suffering from chronic respiratory disorder, and had not performed since November 2018. Martino grew up playing music with fellow South Philadelphians Bobby Rydell and...
PHILADELPHIA, PA
kuvo.org

Long Play — Paying Homage to Pat Martino

Listen to Long Plays during the 11 o’clock hour of The Nightside with Andy O’…these special extensive compositions needed a deeper listen. In his review on Allmusic, Alex Henderson notes that this is “The Philadelphia guitarist was also very much at the height of his creative powers — a fact that’s hard to miss on this excellent session… Martino’s lyricism was never more personal than it is on this album.” Bill Milkowski in JazzTimes stated “it highlights the guitarist at the peak of his interpretive powers… We’ll Be Together Again shows the guitarist’s tender side in a more subdued setting. It sustains a mood of beauty and passion that is positively spellbinding.”
WBUR

Remembering jazz guitarist and composer Pat Martino

Jazz guitarist and composer Pat Martino died earlier this week at 77. We remember his remarkable life. Bill Milkowski, co-author of Martino’s autobiography, “Here and Now!," joins us.
londonjazznews.com

Pat Martino: Memories from David O’Rourke

David O’Rourke has written this personal tribute in gratitude to Pat Martino (*). The Irish guitarist and arranger has lived in New York since the 1980’s. These personal recollections show vividly how Pat Martino’s music is rooted in a culture of generosity and extended family. David O’Rourke writes:. “Be Yourself…”
VERMONT STATE
kuvo.org

Vinyl Vault — Pat Martino, “We’ll Be Together Again”

We lost guitarist Pat Martino on November 1 at the age of 77. He left a rich recorded legacy, and we’ll hear selections from one of his albums on the next Vinyl Vault. “We’ll Be Together Again” was released in 1976 on the Muse label and featured Gil Goldstein on electric piano accompanying Martino’s electric guitar.
Washington Post

Pat Martino, revered jazz guitarist who mastered his instrument twice, dies at 77

By age 35, when Pat Martino learned that he might have only a few hours to live, he was already considered one of jazz music’s finest guitarists. He had developed a sleek and fluid style modeled after guitarist Wes Montgomery, started touring as a teenager and became known for his bracing lines, freewheeling harmonies and dexterity on the fretboard.
jazziz.com

Song of the Day: Pat Martino, “Both Sides Now”

Renowned and influential Philadelphia jazz guitarist Pat Martino passed away on November 1, aged 80. Martino was one of the most original jazz-based guitarists to emerge in the 1960s. He began playing professionally at the age of 15 and quickly became known for the fluidity and speed of his playing. After suffering a brain aneurysm in the early 1980s, he relearned to play his instrument and made a remarkable comeback with The Return in 1987. In 1996, he released Both Sides Now, his acclaimed Blue Note debut as a leader, which saw him teaming up with a variety of fellow guitarists and guests. You can hear his take on Joni Mitchell’s title compositions, featuring Cassandra Wilson on vocals.
jazzwise.com

Pat Martino: 25/08/1944 - 01/02/2021

The late guitarist had an extraordinary career, divided in half by a potentially fatal aneurysm in 1980 and an emergency brain operation that deprived him of his factual and muscle memory. That his recovery also led to a gradual rebirth of his musical ability was a testament to his remarkable dedication. His approach went through several different phases, but he was noted for the freshness and clarity of his execution, with an ability to be creative at high speed. And there was a distinct soulfulness to his work, whatever the style, which reflected his early work in top r-and-b bands.
downbeat.com

In Memoriam: Pat Martino (1944–2021)

Jazz guitarist Pat Martino passed away Nov. 1 at age 77 following a long illness. Known for his incredible guitar chops and a kind heart to match, Martino died after battling a chronic respiratory disorder that prevented his lungs from bringing in oxygen and required around-the-clock treatment. Martino had not worked since 2018 due to the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
guitar.com

Pat Martino, modern jazz guitar great, dies at the age of 77

Pat Martino, the jazz guitar giant who overcame a mid-career brain aneurysm and relearned to play the instrument, has died at the age of 77. The guitarist’s manager, Joseph Donofrio, confirmed his passing, telling the Philadelphia Inquirer that Martino passed away in the same Philadelphia row house he grew up in.
londonjazznews.com

Pat Martino(1944-2021). A Tribute by Ant Law

The Jazz Guitar world is incredibly sad today – we have lost a giant. Pat Martino was one of the greatest who ever lived. As is evident from the tributes which are emerging by the hundred, including from some of the greatest living guitarists. I’m no biographer, but Pat has been a tremendous influence on me, and I humbly offer my own small tribute here.