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Ornette Coleman

shepherdexpress.com

The Genesis of Genius: The Contemporary Albums by Ornette Coleman

Prepare to be haunted by a voice. Now, step inside the realm of Ornette Colman. Few instrumental voices betray their player’s innards as deeply. The person inside that sound, strange to some, became fast friends with me when I first heard it. It tickles a brotherly bone in me, though we never met personally. That’s a rare quality.
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avantmusicnews.com

Ornette Coleman: ‘Genesis of Genius’ Album Review

The likes of Charles Mingus and Leonard Bernstein would later applaud him, but Coleman was even beaten early on by a group of musicians outside a venue in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The story may have taken on some apocryphal dimensions, with details changing slightly the more Coleman told it, but what we do know is that his horn didn’t survive the altercation. Hence his use of an alto made of plastic for the sessions that would yield Something Else!!!!, which has been re-packaged, along with Coleman’s sophomore effort, 1959’s Tomorrow Is The Question!, as the handsome double reissue Genesis of Genius: The Contemporary Recordings.
BATON ROUGE, LA
pleasekillme.com

THE SKY DON’T HAVE NO ROOF: THE LAST ORNETTE COLEMAN INTERVIEW

Ornette Coleman (1930-2015), undoubtedly a great musician and composer who freed jazz from nearly all constrictions, was also a homespun philosopher. In the times he spent talking and playing with Coleman, John Kruth came to that latter conclusion. He also discovered that Ornette Coleman was a damn good pool hustler. John shares the last conversation he had with the jazz master.
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Round Trip: Ornette Coleman on Blue Note

Ornette Coleman revolutionized modern jazz with the six records he released on Atlantic Records between 1959 and 1961. Liberating improvisation from the confines of chordal changes—a shift accentuated by his omission of the piano, an instrument that had been an anchor in hard bop—the alto saxophonist pushed jazz into mercurial territory. His habit of allowing his tone to drift off center, as he found the space between notes, heightened the music’s melody-forward spontaneity. Producer Nesuhi Ertegun convinced Coleman to name his Atlantic debut The Shape of Jazz to Come, a title that carried a sense of prophecy. Indeed, an entire subsection of jazz would name itself after Free Jazz, the 1961 album where Coleman encouraged two quartets to tangle with each other. Groundbreaking at the time, the Atlantic albums can sound relatively conventional to modern ears; many musicians inspired by Coleman’s sense of exploration kept venturing further out. Such is the fate of a pioneer: Innovations become part of the shared vernacular.
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Laredo Morning Times

Revisiting the odd and compelling mid-'60s work of jazz great Ornette Coleman

If you asked jazz firebrand Ornette Coleman about his music and philosophy, he probably would have referred you to an obscure music book, "The Harmolodic Theory." First cited in his own liner notes to his 1972 symphonic album "Skies of America," the alto saxophonist and composer was also the book's author. Only it was never published as a book and largely existed in Coleman's head. Such elusiveness illustrated Coleman's own music and life outlook. His melodies and compositions embodied whimsy and cosmic consciousness, all with an ever-curious, childlike mentality, right down to the fart jokes. "Sound is as free as the gas that passes through your butt," he once told writer Philip Clark.
BOOKS & LITERATURE
Washington Post

Revisiting the odd and compelling mid-'60s work of jazz great Ornette Coleman

If you asked jazz firebrand Ornette Coleman about his music and philosophy, he probably would have referred you to an obscure music book, “The Harmolodic Theory.” First cited in his own liner notes to his 1972 symphonic album “Skies of America,” the alto saxophonist and composer was also the book’s author. Only it was never published as a book and largely existed in Coleman’s head. Such elusiveness illustrated Coleman’s own music and life outlook. His melodies and compositions embodied whimsy and cosmic consciousness, all with an ever-curious, childlike mentality, right down to the fart jokes. “Sound is as free as the gas that passes through your butt,” he once told writer Philip Clark.
BOOKS & LITERATURE
jazziz.com

Vinyl Watch, January 2022: Ornette Coleman, Oscar Peterson & More

Vinyl is back! Each month on “Vinyl Watch,” we list some of the most noteworthy new vinyl releases — including new albums, reissues, special-edition box sets and more. At JAZZIZ, we share the vinyl community’s appreciation of the experience of collecting and playing vinyl records. As an increasing number of music fans discover the joy of vinyl, we hope these lists will serve as a starting point for new musical discoveries.
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analogplanet.com

Round Trip: Ornette Coleman On Blue Note

Coming January 28th: a 6 LP all-analog 180g "Tone Poet"vinyl box set containing all six 1960s Blue Note Ornette Coleman albums including his five as a leader (the two volume At The 'Golden Circle' Stockholm (1965), The Empty Foxhole (1966), New York Is Now! (1968), and Love Call (1968)—as well as Coleman's lone sideman appearances on saxophonist Jackie McLean's New And Old Gospel (1967).
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avantmusicnews.com

Best Ornette Coleman Pieces

Ornette Coleman is regarded as one of the great pioneers of free jazz, a genre that emerged in the late 1950s and continues to influence music today. Perhaps his most famous record is The Shape of Jazz to Come, a prophetically titled album that remains an essential listen for anyone looking to learn about free jazz. In 2012, the Library of Congress added the album to the National Recording Registry, and in 2015, it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
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udiscovermusic.com

Best Ornette Coleman Pieces: Songs of Limitless Creativity

Ornette Coleman is regarded as one of the great pioneers of free jazz, a genre that emerged in the late 1950s and continues to influence music today. Perhaps his most famous record is The Shape of Jazz to Come, a prophetically titled album that remains an essential listen for anyone looking to learn about free jazz. In 2012, the Library of Congress added the album to the National Recording Registry, and in 2015, it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
MUSIC
jazziz.com

Miguel Zenón: Law Years: The Music of Ornette Coleman (Miel Music)

Miguel Zenón is known as much for his methodical explorations of his Puerto Rican heritage as for his blazing inventiveness…. This content is available to subscribers only. To continue reading, please login or start a FREE 14-Day Digital Subscription. Bundle your subscription with our award-winning print magazine here.
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