Lucy Worsley

Entertainmentcountryliving.com

Discover Jane Austen's Bath with Lucy Worsley

Literary-lovers can step back in time to Regency England this autumn on Country Living's exclusive trip to Bath with TV historian Lucy Worsley. During the incredible break, you'll explore the city and countryside that inspired many of Jane Austen’s novels. From Pride And Prejudice and Emma to Sense And Sensibility...
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Entertainmentgoodhousekeeping.com

Discover Jane Austen's Bath with Lucy Worsley

Literary-lovers can step back in time to Regency England this autumn on Good Housekeeping's exclusive trip to Bath with TV historian Lucy Worsley. During the incredible break, you'll explore the city and countryside that inspired many of Jane Austen’s novels. From Pride And Prejudice and Emma to Sense And Sensibility...
Picture for Discover Jane Austen's Bath with Lucy Worsley
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Celebritieswagmag.com

All hail Lucy Worsley, historian and TV star

She suffers from rhotacism, which makes it difficult for her to pronounce the letter “r.” She wears her straight blond hair parted on the side and held in check by a barette. And her ensembles, which can appear too big for her, are always accented with pops of neon colors that don’t necessarily go together and white sneakers.
TV & VideosThe Guardian

The week in TV: Bloodlands; Unforgotten; Blitz Spirit With Lucy Worsley; Grayson's Art Club

Blitz Spirit with Lucy Worsley (BBC One) | iPlayer. Is it possible for anyone outside the confines of Northern Ireland, outside all those gaunt, dripping branches and rolling green hummocks, to cram so many vowel sounds into a single-syllable word, eg the word “now”? As in “Leave, now! Naouiheaiuughea, I tell ye!” We were reintroduced to that grand Belfast accent courtesy of BBC One’s nicely wriggly four-parter Bloodlands, and I feel I can still hear the chill tattoo of hard rain on tin roofs.
CelebritiesThe Guardian

Lucy Worsley: ‘I thought my parents’ TV was a waste of money’

My parents weren’t keen on me watching television when I was growing up, in the 70s and 80s, which is ironic given that I’ve ended up working in it. My dad was a lecturer at Reading university and my mum worked at the Workers’ Educational Association. They grew all their own vegetables and were awfully middle class. TV was rationed in our house – I would play the piano instead, for an hour a day. My brother wanted to watch the TV so much that he would quite happily sit in front of the test card.
TV & VideosThe Guardian

TV tonight: Lucy Worsley is back and investigating the blitz

The BBC’s favourite historical fancy dresser returns for a special focused on the lives of six people who lived through the blitz in Britain. With 44,652 people having died beneath the rubble caused by the heavy bombing of British cities between 7 September 1940 and 11 May 1941, Worsley recounts powerful first-hand stories of those living in the frontline of this bloody period of our history. Archive footage combines with testimony to create a vivid reimagining. Ammar Kalia.
SocietyTelegraph

Lucy Worsley: ‘Did the Blitz spirit really exist?’

My father is 81 and can just about remember being bombed from the air. He was a small child at the time. What’s remained in his memory is going down into the bomb shelter, and seeing the red sky ablaze over Hull. Most of all, though, what he remembers and...
Entertainmentinews.co.uk

Lucy Worsley: When I get nervous doing history talks I take inspiration from cocky Queen Victoria

My favourite monarch once said: “The important thing is not what they think of me. It’s what I think of them.”. In normal times I spend a great deal of my time giving history talks. I’ve done them in palaces, in tents, on ships and once in a village hall to an audience including the Queen. I love talking about history, even to people who think they don’t like the subject.