Joy Harjo

Framingham, MAMetroWest Daily News

FSU wins Big Read grant; U.S. poet laureate Joy Harjo will visit campus

FRAMINGHAM — The first Native American poet laureate of the United States will visit Framingham State University this winter, after the college won a competitive grant. The National Endowment for the Arts Big Read grant of $19,970 will support a community reading program focusing on "An American Sunrise," by poet Joy Harjo. She was appointed as the newest United States poet laureate in June 2019.
Picture for FSU wins Big Read grant; U.S. poet laureate Joy Harjo will visit campus
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE
Books & Literaturelakotatimes.com

US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo on what home means for Native Americans kicked off their land

As a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo is the descendant of Native Americans who were forcibly removed from their land in the 19th century Trail of Tears. Thousands died on the march from their ancestral homes in the Southeast to so-called “Indian Territory,” which is now Oklahoma. Much of Harjo’s work explores themes of home, place, and displacement.
Books & Literaturesavingplaces.org

U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo: A Life in Four Directions

A poet, writer, academic, musician, and activist, Joy Harjo is the first Native American to be named the United States Poet Laureate. Harjo’s poetry evokes not only her Muscogee (Creek) heritage, but is also often tied to landscapes in the Southwest, Southeast, Alaska, and Hawaii. To hear a Joy Harjo poem is to consider the role of memory and history through generations.
Northampton, MAsmith.edu

Poet Joy Harjo: ‘Remake Our World’

In a commencement speech alive with her own literary art, United States Poet Laureate Joy Harjo urged members of the Smith class of 2021 to avoid a “turn back” to a pre-pandemic reality, and instead, to map a different future, using the tools of “truth, wildness, beauty, transformation, bravery.”. Addressing...
Jamestown, VAwydaily.com

U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to speak at Jamestown Settlement

JAMESTOWN — The 23rd United States Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo, who made history as the first American Indian to hold the position, is scheduled to speak on Saturday, June 5 at Jamestown Settlement. Her lecture is in conjunction with the yearlong special exhibition, “FOCUSED: A Century of Virginia Indian Resilience.”
Coushatta, LAnativenewsonline.net

"I See Them in My Dreams" Says Joy Harjo of MMIW Victims after Screening of "Say Her Name" & "Somebody's Daughter" by the Coushatta Tribe

ELTON, La — “I was writing down the names of all the young women and I’m haunted by them. I read them, and I see them in my dreams,” said Joy Harjo (Muscogee Nation), the twenty-third Poet Laureate of the United States, after viewing the MMIWG documentaries Say Her Name and Somebody’s Daughter on the big screen.
Books & LiteratureLiterary Hub

Joy Harjo on Words as Maps, and a Poem by Craig Santos Perez

The very first maps were drawn into the earth with stick or stone implements. They told us where we lived, the location of food, water, and danger. Some were star maps of the heavens, histories notched and painted, or symbols of stories that gave directions on how to live. The earliest indigenous maps of North America were not drawn. The placement and orientation of a village, its buildings, and even mound structures were markers that mirrored the meaning of the heavens, or other directional senses. Even a basket could be a map, or a song. We carry maps of destiny in our poems.
Books & LiteratureDallas News

The healing power of poetry: A conversation with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

Remember all is in motion, is growing, is you. Remember language comes from this. Remember the dance language is, that life is. Those wise and healing lines come from “Remember,” the first poem Joy Harjo recited as the first Native American U.S. poet laureate, playing the alto sax and traditional flute in turn with her jazz band, Poetic Justice, at her inaugural reading in Washington, D.C., in September 2019.
Books & Literaturekcrw.com

Indigenous US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo explores ideas of home

As a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo is the descendant of Native Americans who were forcibly removed from their land in the 19th century Trail of Tears. Thousands died on the march from their ancestral homes in the Southeast to so-called “Indian Territory,” which is now Oklahoma. Much of Harjo’s work explores themes of home, place, and displacement.
Entertainmentmilitarynews.com

UNITED STATES POET LAUREATE JOY HARJO TO SPEAK JUNE 5 AT JAMESTOWN SETTLEMENT

Joy Harjo, the 23rd United States Poet Laureate and the first American Indian to hold the position, will speak on Saturday, June 5 at Jamestown Settlement, a museum of 17th-century Virginia history and culture. The program is being held in conjunction with the yearlong special exhibition, “FOCUSED: A Century of Virginia Indian Resilience.”
Entertainmenthistoryisfun.org

Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to Speak June 5 at Jamestown Settlement

Joy Harjo, the 23rd United States Poet Laureate and the first American Indian to hold the position, will speak on Saturday, June 5 at Jamestown Settlement, a museum of 17th-century Virginia history and culture. The program is being held in conjunction with the yearlong special exhibition, “FOCUSED: A Century of Virginia Indian Resilience.”
Politicsnativenewsonline.net

Joy Harjo, Marcella LeBeau Among National Native American Hall of Fame 2021 Inductees

The National Native American Hall of Fame (NNAHOF) this week announced eight new inductees from across Indian Country, celebrated for their contributions in Native advocacy, politics, athletics, arts, health, and culture preservation and revitalization. Inductees include: Dave Anderson (Ojibwe), a businessman and entrepreneur; Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne); Joy...
Books & Literatureinfodocket.com

A New Anthology Edited by U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo: “Living Nations, Living Words: An Anthology of First Peoples Poetry”; Online Audio Collection Also Available

Edited by Joy Harjo, the first Native poet to serve as U.S. Poet Laureate, “Living Nations, Living Words: An Anthology of First Peoples Poetry” is a powerful, moving anthology that celebrates the breadth of Native poets writing today. The new anthology is published by W. W. Norton & Company in association with the Library of Congress.
Marquette, MIwnmufm.org

Interview with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, "I Pray For My Enemies"

Find more information about Joy and her work at her website joyharjo.com. April is National Poetry Month, and Public Radio 90 observes the occasion by presenting readings by poets from Northern Michigan University and surrounding communities. Today's poetry comes from Alex Vartan Gubbins, who lives in West Ishpeming and has...
Books & Literaturemprnews.org

Poet laureate Joy Harjo on 'Living Nations, Living Words'

Joy Harjo, the first Native American to serve as poet laureate of the U.S., is known for weaving heritage and history into her works of poetry. Inspired by Native traditions and oral histories, her latest project, “Living Nations, Living Words,” highlights the work of contemporary Native poets from across the country, and collects their words and their voice into an interactive digital map that transcends physical space.
El Paso, TXtheprospectordaily.com

Poet laureate Joy Harjo recites poems, songs at Somos Writers series

The UTEP department of Creative Writing hosted an online interactive event with Poet Laureate Joy Harjo in honor of the Somos Writers Spring Series event taking place through the entirety of National Poetry Month. Opening with a Spanish translation of Joy Harjo’s “The Woman Who Fell from the Sky” read...