John Coltrane

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John Coltrane: Top Ten Live Albums

Someone in the audience would stand up, their arms upreaching, and they would be like that for an hour or more. Their clothing would be soaked with perspiration, and when they finally sat down they practically fell down. The music took people out of the material world. This article is...
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ReligionLiterary Hub

How Malcolm X Inspired John Coltrane to Embrace Islamic Spirituality

One of the most important artists in the 1960s, Coltrane pas­sionately expressed his African American Islamic spirituality both in his album A Love Supreme (Impulse!, 1965) and in his exploration of self-purification, new musical forms, and the Black Arts movement in New York. Coltrane expanded the geographic and religious frame of black internationalism, experimented with new sounds and spiritual tradi­tions from the Third World, played with Muslim artists in his band, and developed a serious interest in Sufi mysticism.
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Entertainmentgratefulweb.com

Learn about Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, and more Jazz Legends this Spring

Swing University offers engaging virtual classes for jazz fans, enthusiasts, and students of all backgrounds and levels. Our fun and informal classes are taught by industry experts like Seton Hawkins, Todd Stoll, and Justin Poindexter as well as members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra including Victor Goines, Vincent Gardner, and more. Explore jazz history, discuss new and classic tunes, and discover listening methods that will improve your concert experiences.
Musicallaboutjazz.com

John Coltrane: An Alternative Top Ten Albums

Keep listening. Never become so self-important that you can’t listen to other players. Live cleanly. Do right. You can improve as a player by improving as a person. It’s a duty we owe ourselves. Miles Davis once said that you could recite the history of jazz in just four words:...
Public HealthBangor Daily News

How John Coltrane has sustained me during the pandemic

The BDN Opinion section operates independently and does not set newsroom policies or contribute to reporting or editing articles elsewhere in the newspaper or on bangordailynews.com. Natalie Ruth Joynton is the author of the memoir “Welcome to Replica Dodge.”. Lately I’ve been thinking about art that is sacred, but not...
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Visual Artarcamax.com

Commentary: How John Coltrane has sustained me during the pandemic

Lately I’ve been thinking about art that is sacred, but not religious. Art that sustains us in hard times, but doesn’t tell us what to think. Years ago, in Houston’s Rothko Chapel, I had my first experience with that kind of art. Giant, dark, undulating with the natural light of that nondenominational space, Rothko’s paintings served as a connection point for me during a difficult time.
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Los Angeles Times

Op-Ed: How John Coltrane has sustained me during the pandemic

Lately I’ve been thinking about art that is sacred, but not religious. Art that sustains us in hard times, but doesn’t tell us what to think. Years ago, in Houston’s Rothko Chapel, I had my first experience with that kind of art. Giant, dark, undulating with the natural light of that nondenominational space, Rothko’s paintings served as a connection point for me during a difficult time.
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Audacy

Activists trying to save John Coltrane house from demolition

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The historic Strawberry Mansion residence of jazz legend John Coltrane is at risk of being demolished. Neighbors and activists have stepped up to try to save it. The National Historic Landmark, located at 1511 N. 33rd St., shares a load-bearing wall with a property scheduled for...
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Celebrating Black love, John Coltrane and Marian Anderson in this week’s ‘Things to Do’

As Black History Month comes to a close, events around the region celebrate the accomplishments of extraordinary African-Americans. The legendary John Coltrane revolutionized jazz music with his innovative style of play. Though he died of liver cancer at just 40 years old, Coltrane’s legacy as one of the most prolific and influential artists of all time endures. The Philadelphia Jazz Legacy Project will pay homage to him in a free talk with musician/educator Lewis Porter, who authored two books on Coltrane and documentarian/historian Steve Rowland, producer of the audio doc “Tell Me How Long The Trane’s Been Gone.” Jazz Legacy project director Suzanne Cloud will host.
Musicjazziz.com

John Coltrane, Billie Holiday, Christian McBride & More: The Week in Jazz

The Week in Jazz is your roundup of new and noteworthy stories from the jazz world. It’s a one-stop destination for the music news you need to know. Let’s take it from the top. Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio Reimagine George Michael: The Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio will release their sophomore...
Musicdownbeat.com

John Coltrane, Out Of Obscurity

In late June of 1964, in between Impulse Records studio dates for Crescent and A Love Supreme, saxophonist John Coltrane brought his classic quartet with pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison, and drummer Elvin Jones to Rudy Van Gelder’s New Jersey studio to lay down a handful of abbreviated tracks. Recorded outside of the label’s purview, these off-trail tapes remained shrouded in near obscurity until September 2019, when Impulse released Blue World, the output from that day’s session.