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Joe Davis

KTLA.com

Sportscaster Joe Davis reflects on Dodger icon Vin Scully

Dodgers play-by-play announcer Joe Davis joined us live to share his personal experience with Dodger legend Vin Scully and the impact he had on him. The Dodgers broadcasting legend died Tuesday at the age of 94. This segment aired on the KTLA 5 Morning News on Aug. 4, 2022.
LOS ANGELES, CA
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Dodgers: Joe Davis Pays Beautiful Tribute to Vin Scully Mid-Game

What Joe Davis was able to do on Tuesday night was pretty incredible, all things considered. With such a sad and sudden announcement of the passing of Vin Scully, the Dodgers play-by-play man handled it with perfect tact and emotions. He allowed fans to feel the moment while also offering anecdotes to remind us all how lucky we were to know Vin.
LOS ANGELES, CA
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Twitter Reacts to Hearing Joe Davis Instead of Joe Buck Call the MLB All-Star Game

Fans tuning into the 2022 MLB All-Star Game experienced what can only be described as the unfamiliar: a very high-profile baseball game on FOX that did not feature the voice of Joe Buck. It's now obvious that this was an overlooked side effect of Buck and Troy Aikman being lured away from FOX by ESPN. The voice that has called the last 24 World Series is no longer doing baseball. Last night was the first time that FOX or viewers had a chance to miss Buck and judging by Twitter, many did.
MLB
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LOS ANGELES, CA
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Fox’s Joe Davis Is Learning To ‘Let Myself Be Myself’ On The Heels Of His First All-Star Broadcast

Progress isn’t linear. It’s one of those axioms that gets thrown up on a whiteboard at motivational seminars, or parroted by coaches as certifiable. It’s dismissed casually now; pushed to the side of “keeping the main thing the main thing” or “controlling what you can control” and left for athletes to tweet in all caps with a bunch of emojis. It’s a shame, since the basic tenets of the phrase are extremely important, especially as the lines between traditional measures of success and failure dissolve and hierarchal paths result in a [page not found].
LOS ANGELES, CA