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Jessica B. Harris

EatingWell

Dr. Jessica B. Harris Sips Hurricane Cocktails on her Porch Up North—Find Out Why, and How to Make Them

June 1 marked the beginning of hurricane season in the Atlantic region. It is the time when folks with any connection to the Caribbean and along the Gulf of Mexico and parts of the Atlantic begin to put question marks near activities and events, thinking of evacuation plans. This is doubly true in the Crescent City at the bend in the Mississippi River known as New Orleans, where I have had a house for more than 20 years. The city has won a big piece of my heart, and my spot brings me joy and delight and, over the years, a load of friends.
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TODAY.com

Jessica B. Harris reflects on the significance of Haitian soup joumou

Dr. Jessica B. Harris is an award-winning culinary historian, cookbook author and journalist who specializes in the food and foodways of the African diaspora. With this column, "My Culinary Compass," she is taking people all over the world — via their taste buds — with recipes inspired by her extensive travels.
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Food52

Red Snapper Fillets in Creole Court Bouillon From Dr. Jessica B. Harris

"This is a variation on the redfish court bouillon that is traditionally served in many of the Black Creole homes of New Orleans at Christmastime. Here, though, instead of the entire baked fish, snapper fillets are poached in the Creole court bouillon, which is more like a Creole sauce than like the classic French court bouillon poaching liquid. You may wish to serve this as a main dish, or as an alternative main dish along the more traditional roasts that usually appear on the New Year table."
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Food52

Carrots With Ginger From Dr. Jessica B. Harris

"Root vegetables are winter standbys on the vegetable table. Though many folks whine when served rutabagas and pout over parsnips, one root vegetable that generally meets with universal approval is carrots. Here, they're simply cooked in a little orange juice with a bit of ginger and freshly ground nutmeg to give them more character."
Time

Jessica B. Harris

For me, the work that Jessica B. Harris has done has given me a deeper sense of who I am as an African American, and why I should be proud to be an African American. It’s one thing to have Black history, but she has the ability to relay information from the perspective of the culture, looking at our food and what our ancestors have eaten—our DNA on a plate.