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Jay Thomas

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Ernestine Anderson, Jim Knapp, Jay Thomas featured on Jazz Northwest

Every Sunday afternoon we feature some of the outstanding jazz artists who've graced our scene in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. This week includes one of Ernestine Anderson's last recordings in front of a New York audience at Dizzy's Club. Also on this show is the last recording of the Jim Knapp Orchestra playing Knapp's original music and arrangements, and The Jay Thomas Quartet live at the late lamented Tula's in Seattle in 2002. Reuel Lubag, Trio, Kelley Eisenhour and others are also included.
SEATTLE, WA
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‘Cheers’: Why Jay Thomas Was Written Off the Series

In each episode of the classic television sitcom series Cheers, we see a tight group of quirky characters. A group of characters who, despite their different daily lives, will always come together to help each other…no matter what. And, as one behind-the-scenes tale tells us, this tight-knit group stood up for each other both on and off camera.
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Miami New Times

Jay Thomas Puts His Hopes and Anxieties to Work on Butterfly Parade

Jay Thomas comes from a long line of performers. "My grandfather was a comedian and actor in England. My mom played piano; she was once on The Benny Hill Show. My dad is a Rod Stewart impersonator, or a tribute act as he would prefer to say," Thomas tells New Times with a laugh.
MIAMI, FL
Mitchellrepublic.com

Jay Thomas

Jay checks out The Horsepower Barn on this episode of 'Rides with Jay Thomas'. Usually, when you think of barns, you think of animals. But this place is packing some Pontiac horsepower. Jay finds a collection and focuses on a Mark II on this episode of 'Rides with Jay Thomas'
TV & VIDEOS

‘Cheers’: Here’s Why Jay Thomas Left the Show

Cheers was an iconic show from decades ago starring Ted Danson and friends. Fans of the program still flock to various streaming services to rewatch their favorite episodes from the show. Folks came and went on the sitcom, it’s how things go for the most part. However, Jay Thomas, who played ice hockey player Eddie Lebec on the show, was killed off not too long after marrying one of the main characters in the show to Carla.
TV & VIDEOS
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nativesunnews.today

Jay Thomas Bad Heart Bull “Kangi Ikinicapi”

Jay Thomas Bad Heart Bull was born on September 17, 1978 in Pine Ridge, SD to Thomas Bad Heart Bull and Loretta (Grey Day) Bad Heart Bull. Jay made his journey to the Spirit World on August 9, 2021 at the Methodist Hospital in St. Louis Park, MN. Jay is...
OBITUARIES
lakotatimes.com

JAY THOMAS BAD HEART BULL

SEPT 17, 1978 – AUG 9, 2021. Jay Thomas Bad Heart Bull was born on September 17, 1978 in Pine Ridge, SD to Thomas Bad Heart Bull and Loretta (Grey Day) Bad Heart Bull. Jay made his journey to the Spirit World on August 9, 2021 at the Methodist Hospital in St. Louis Park, MN.
OBITUARIES
wdayradionow.com

Scott Hennen vs Jay Thomas: Battle of the My Pillow promo codes

Scott Hennen is stalking Jay Thomas in the parking lot over his shenanigans on the battle of their My Pillow promo codes. WHAT A DEAL on my Pillow towels...$39.99 for a 6 piece towel set that you can only buy at MyPillow.com. IF you use the promo code SCOTT or...
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From the Vault: Seattle’s Jay Thomas Tells His Story

Veteran Seattle musician Jay Thomas’ dazzling new autobiography, Life and Jazz Stories, bristles with the color, humor and detail of a picaresque novel while at the same time serving as a mini-history of local jazz from the 1960s to the present. It is a blow-by-blow account of one artist’s musical development and a humble confession of recovery from a heroin addiction. On the page, Thomas comes across much as he does in person—witty, hip, eager, curious, vulnerable, and slightly amused by the craziness of it all. Refreshingly, he often sounds as excited about other players as himself. His stories about where and when he suddenly gained new musical insights are as priceless as they are rare in first-person jazz works. His musical descriptions such as, Tony Williams playing a “flibbertygibbet with a trap door hidden in it”, are the very substance of good jazz writing. Thomas shares a plethora of hilarious insider stories, like the night he cold-called Thelonious Monk to complain that he couldn’t find any good jazz in New York or when he dissed an arrogant Roy Hargrove at a jam session whispering in his ear, “You sound beautiful, man…we used to sound that way in the ‘60s.” Sometimes the narrative is a bit dizzying (Thomas is not one for citing dates; however he does offer 127 extensive endnotes about various people and institutions). Likewise, the book could definitely use a chronology and an index, but in a way that’s all part of its conversational charm.
SEATTLE, WA