Jacqueline Woodson

Books & Literaturethekatynews.com

2020/2021 Inprint Cool Brains! Series presents four-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson with new middle-grade novel Before the Ever After on June 27th

Cool Brains! Series presents an exciting afternoon with four-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson, sharing her new middle-grade novel Before the Ever After. The event takes place on Sunday, June 27, 4 pm CT via the Inprint “virtual studio.” Free tickets, required to access the livestream, are available through the Inprint website, inprinthouston.org. After a short presentation, Woodson will respond to video questions/messages submitted by kids. The first 20 kids to submit videos for Woodson will receive a free hardcover copy of Before the Ever After. For more information, visit inprinthouston.org or call 713.521.2026.
Picture for 2020/2021 Inprint Cool Brains! Series presents four-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson with new middle-grade novel Before the Ever After on June 27th
Books & Literaturethekatynews.com

Jacqueline Woodson

The 2020/2021 Inprint Cool Brains! Series presents an exciting afternoon with four-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson, sharing her new middle-grade novel Before the Ever After. The event takes place on Sunday, June 27, 4 pm CT via the Inprint “virtual studio.” Free tickets, required to access the livestream, are available through the Inprint website, inprinthouston.org. After a short presentation, Woodson will respond to video questions/messages submitted by kids. The first 20 kids to submit videos for Woodson will receive a free hardcover copy of Before the Ever After. For more information, visit inprinthouston.org or call 713.521.2026. Jacqueline Woodson is the critically-acclaimed author of more than 30 […]
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Portland, ORopb.org

Jacqueline Woodson

Is the author of “Miracle’s Boys,” “Harbor Me” and many other books for children and young adults. Her bestselling memoir “Brown Girl Dreaming” is written in verse and in 2015, the Poetry Foundation named her the Young People’s Poet Laureate. She was awarded a MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” in 2020. We spoke with Woodson in front of a small audience at Literary Arts in downtown Portland in 2019.
Crozet, VAcrozetgazette.com

Same Page: Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson

Red at the Bone (2019) by Jacqueline Woodson, the Crozet Library book club’s selection for March, opens on the evening of Melody’s coming-of-age ceremony. As she dons the dress made for—but never worn by—her mother, they share a cold, angry conversation that implies a deep-seated alienation and hurt between them. This conversation raises several questions that are answered only by the end of the novel: why is their relationship so strained? Why is Melody so angry at her mother? Why did Iris never wear the dress, or participate in her own ceremony? Through snapshot flashbacks from the lives of Iris, Melody’s father Aubrey, her four grandparents, and beyond, Woodson explores themes of race, class, education, young love, sexual identity, parent-child relationships, loss, and grief. “I am not Melody who is sixteen,” our protagonist tells us. “I am not my parents’ once illegitimate daughter—I am a narrative, someone’s almost forgotten story. Remembered.” That narrative comprises the balance of Red at the Bone.
Entertainmentpoetryfoundation.org

Jacqueline Woodson

When I was a kid, there was this song that played on the radio all the time. It talked about a road that was long and a brother who had to be carried on it. The singer said the brother wasn’t heavy. That he was, simply, his brother. And that line repeated again and again—He ain’t heavy. He’s my brother. And something about the way the singer’s voice hugged these words, proclaimed them to the world, caught in the back of my throat. Making it hard to move. To swallow. I didn’t know then—at nine, ten, eleven—that this was love. That this was community. That this was about a greater good. If the road is long, it doesn’t matter what you weigh—I will carry you.
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SocietyPosted by
TIME

‘We Have a Right to Speak.’ Watch Brit Bennett, Jasmine Guillory and Jacqueline Woodson Discuss the Shift of Power Toward Black Women Writers

Following a year filled with anti-racist reading lists and proclamations to “listen to Black women,” novelists Brit Bennett, Jasmine Guillory and Jacqueline Woodson reflected on what what it means to be a Black writer today on the Feb. 5 “Black in America” episode of TIME100 Talks. In a roundtable conversation, also part of TIME and Ibram X. Kendi’s Black Renaissance project, the novelists and moderator Rebecca Carroll emphasized the longstanding contributions of Black women writers.
SocietyPosted by
TIME

‘We Know Our Stories Matter.’ Brit Bennett, Jasmine Guillory and Jacqueline Woodson Discuss the Importance of Fiction

Black women have been honoring and lifting our voices, sharing our strengths, broadening our revolutionary scope since we got here. We tell stories that come through our hair and our hips, our shoulders and our ride-or-die stride as we walk alongside one another, tethered to our tropes, ever strong, mammified, over-sexualized but ultimately free together. Brit Bennett, Jasmine Guillory and Jacqueline Woodson are three of our finest novelists in America today. They tell narrative stories with grace and nuance, humor and curiosity, and with characters who exist because Black women called them to live. The four of us spoke about the long-standing contributions of Black women writers, who holds the power in publishing and the notion of a renaissance. —R.C.
Brooklyn, NYthecut.com

How Author Jacqueline Woodson Gets It Done

Jacqueline Woodson is an author of adult and children’s literature with more than two dozen titles to her name, including Red at the Bone (2019), Another Brooklyn (2016), and Brown Girl Dreaming (2014), for which she won the National Book Award in Young People’s Literature. In May of this year, she was awarded the biggest international prize in children’s literature, the Hans Christian Andersen Award, and in October was named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow. Last year, Woodson started building Baldwin for the Arts, an artist colony based in Brewster, N.Y. for writers, composers, and visual artists of color. She currently lives between Brewster and Park Slope with her two kids and partner. The Cut spoke to Woodson about her hectic schedule and the importance of mapping out a structure for each day, especially while social distancing restrictions remain in place. Here is how she gets it done.