Ian Rankin

Books & LiteratureTelegraph

Ian Rankin chose fictional Highland village for new crime novel after locals were upset he used real one

Ian Rankin has revealed he chose to use a fictional Highland village for his new novel after he was criticised by residents previously for using a real one. The crime writer has told how he invented a location for latest Inspector Rebus book, A Song For The Dark Times, after he caused upset for featuring Rosemarkie, a village on the Highland peninsula Black Isle, in a previous novel.
Picture for Ian Rankin chose fictional Highland village for new crime novel after locals were upset he used real one
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Books & LiteratureThe Guardian

My favourite Ishiguro: by Margaret Atwood, Ian Rankin and more

A Kazuo Ishiguro novel is never about what it pretends to be about, and Never Let Me Go is true to form. Its narrator, Kathy H, is examining her school days at a superficially idyllic establishment called Hailsham, which raises children cloned to provide organs to “normal” people. They don’t have parents, they can’t have children. Once grown, they’ll serve as “carers” to those already being harvested; then they’ll be harvested themselves.
Books & LiteratureThe Guardian

Ian Rankin: 'Why does it take celebrity voices for the disabled to be heard?'

Kit Rankin just loves being around people, says his father, Ian. “He loves hugs and if you go near him you’re getting a hug whether you want it or not. “He’s better known around the streets of Edinburgh than I am,” adds the crime novelist with a wry laugh. “People stop me and say ‘Oh, you’re Kit’s dad’, because when he’s taken out to do the shopping everybody notices him because he’s blond and he’s laughing.”
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Daily Mail

Crime writer Ian Rankin recalls how guests cheered Fred Goodwin and RBS chiefs as they walked in 'like Reservoir Dogs' at 2007 party celebrating the disastrous takeover of ABN Amro

Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin has recalled how he partied with disgraced RBS boss Fred Goodwin a year before the bank was bailed out by the Government. Speaking in BBC Scotland documentary The Years That Changed Modern Scotland, Rankin, 60, tells how he was invited to a bash at the RBS headquarters at Gogarburn, in Edinburgh, to celebrate the ABN Amro takeover.