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Helen Frankenthaler

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anothermag.com

Win Free Tickets to London’s Helen Frankenthaler Exhibition

Abstract expressionism – wild, riotous painting by the likes of Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning from the 1940s and 1950s, created mostly in New York – was a male-dominated artistic niche. A recent slew of exhibitions in London prove that, in fact, women were involved too – there was a Lee Krasner (Pollock’s wife) show at the Barbican in 2019, and now, there’s a series of dreamlike Helen Frankenthaler woodcuts at Dulwich Picture Gallery. “A really good picture looks as if it’s happened at once,” she once said. “It’s an immediate image. For my own work, when a picture looks laboured and overworked ... there is something in it that has not got to do with beautiful art to me.”
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Telegraph

Helen Frankenthaler and ‘the watercolour that ate the art world’

In 1952, with the first chill of autumn in the air, Helen Frankenthaler knelt on the floor of her New York studio and began pouring paint. Thinned with turpentine, it sloshed and pooled on the canvas beneath her. Overcome “with impatience, laziness,” as she later put it, she hadn’t bothered to seal the surface of the canvas, so her colours sank into its fibres, then bloomed into soft shapes that looked as if they had risen from a watery underworld.
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