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Haskell Wexler

Roger Ebert

Jesus, I Love to Shoot Film: The Siskel Film Center Pays Tribute to Haskell Wexler

The late Haskell Wexler is regarded as one of the greatest and most innovative talents to ever work in the field of cinematography. As a filmmaker in his own right, his output was smaller but no less interesting and included one of the boldest and most daring films ever made in the city of Chicago. As a political and social activist of the first order, he tirelessly campaigned for the rights and safety of people all over, including within his own industry, right up until his passing in 2015 at the age of 93.
CHICAGO, IL
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newsnationusa.com

Happy 100th Birthday to Haskell Wexler! | Chaz’s Journal

Today, we are paying tribute to him by looking back at some of Roger’s most memorable coverage of Haskell, beginning with his interview with him on August 10th, 1969. Haskell had already made a name for himself as the Oscar-winning cinematographer of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”, before helming his own breakthrough directorial feature, 1969’s “Medium Cool,” a narrative effort that famously filmed scenes during the violence that erupted during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, in which a TV reporter (played by Robert Forster) finds himself in over his head. Roger wrote that “Medium Cool” was “the best film ever made in Chicago […] but it is not a ‘Chicago film’ any more than it’s a film about politics, hippies, cops, violence, sex, poverty, black militants or its other subjects. It is a film about the nature of communication, about the shades of meaning that can be superimposed on the face of ‘reality.'”
CHICAGO, IL
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