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Haben Girma

Emory Wheel

Haben Girma, a deafblind woman, shares her struggle against ableism and encourages advocacy to improve accessibility

In honor of Women’s History Month, Emory University’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion held a conversation with Haben Girma, the first deafblind person to graduate from Harvard Law School (Mass.), on confronting ableism. The virtual event took place on March 17 and was facilitated by Ani B. Satz, a professor at both Emory’s School of Law and the Rollins School of Public Health.
ATLANTA, GA
Picture for Haben Girma, a deafblind woman, shares her struggle against ableism and encourages advocacy to improve accessibility
Law.com

'Separate Is Never Equal': Harvard Law Graduate Haben Girma on Fighting Ableism

Emory University hosts panel featuring human rights attorney Haben Girma, the first deafblind graduate of Harvard Law. Girma advocated against ableism, a discrimination in favor of able-bodied people, and in favor of innovative inclusion. Discrimination against disabled people includes accessibility narration and accommodation resistance in educational settings and legal hiring...
Picture for 'Separate Is Never Equal': Harvard Law Graduate Haben Girma on Fighting Ableism
palomar.edu

Palomar to Host Celebrated Author, Lawyer Haben Girma

SAN MARCOS — The celebrated human rights lawyer Haben Girma, author of “Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law,” will speak during a special event in Brubeck Theatre at Palomar College to be held Monday, March 14, at 4:00 p.m. During the event, entitled, “Disability &...
SAN MARCOS, CA
Forbes

Making Tech Accessible For Disabled And Nondisabled People In Conversation With Haben Girma And Rachel Arfa

I recently had the distinct pleasure of interviewing two incredible women, both accomplished disability advocates, on the subject of diversity, equity and inclusion in our tech sphere. The uplifting Haben Girma, first deafblind person to graduate from Harvard Law School, human rights lawyer advancing disability justice and keynote speaker at this year’s Grace Hopper Celebration (vGHC) joined me in discussion with Rachel Arfa, the first deaf Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (MOPD) for the City of Chicago, and the highest-ranking deaf person to serve in a city government leadership role. We connected on our own deep levels of intersectionality, recognizing how important it is for all of us, especially in the tech industry, to celebrate and champion the ways in which we are different and diverse and what a difference that would make to the tech we can create. Because the technology industry bears the responsibility for creating change, we discussed steps the industry can make to remove barriers, allowing disabled people to work and learn alongside nondisabled colleagues and students.