F. Lee Bailey

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CBS News

F. Lee Bailey: An appreciation

Last week I was supposed to sit down for an interview with F Lee Bailey that would have aired on this program. As most of you probably know, Bailey died on June 3. He was 87. For many lawyers like myself, Bailey was the one you wanted to emulate – or, if you were charged with a crime, the one you wanted to hire.
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Monmouth, ILDaily Review Atlas

William Urban: F. Lee Bailey and others who spoke at Monmouth College

The news that F. Lee Bailey died this week made headlines briefly, but only briefly because so few remember how popular he once was. But my memory of meeting him remains vivid, because he was among the most spectacular guests we had at Monmouth College in the past half-century. The late '60s were our golden age of guest speakers, because national celebrities were not expensive, and their agents were often eager to fill in an empty day during a tour.
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Florida Phoenix

The life and death of famed defense attorney F. Lee Bailey, with some FL anecdotes

Quality Journalism for Critical Times It was pretty clear that famed attorney F. Lee Bailey was on his way down when he leaned over a federal courtroom bench in Ocala and asked me for a ride back to the Hilton Hotel. It was the first time the defendant in any trial asked me for a ride during a lifetime of […] The post The life and death of famed defense attorney F. Lee Bailey, with some FL anecdotes appeared first on Florida Phoenix.
Lynn, MADaily Item

Krause: Lynn loomed large in legacy of F. Lee Bailey

Defense attorney F. Lee Bailey moves to call new witnesses concerning former Los Angeles Police Department Detective Mark Fuhrman's use of racial epithets and possible involvement with Nazi symbols, Sept 1, 1995, during the O.J. Simpson double murder trial in Los Angeles. At left is prosecuting attorney William Hodgman. (AP Photo/Pool/Reed Saxon) (AP)
ObituariesSo Md News.com

F. Lee Bailey dies, was mock attorney for Dr. Samuel Mudd

F. Lee Bailey, the criminal defense attorney best known for representing O. J. Simpson and other famous or notorious defendants, died June 3 in Atlanta. He was 87 and had been in poor health. I met Mr. Bailey back in 1992 when the University of Richmond staged a mock trial...
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Distractify

F. Lee Bailey Loved the Limelight, and He Represented Plenty of Famous People

As reflection begins on F. Lee Bailey's legacy following the news of his death, there are a number of cases that he took part in that are worthy of reflection. Although he was an attorney by trade, F. Lee represented a number of hugely famous people over the course of his career, and he became notorious in part for his desire to bask in the limelight.
Atlanta, GALaw.com

A Look Back at Famed Defense Attorney F. Lee Bailey's Controversial Career

F. Lee Bailey, the dramatic criminal defense lawyer who represented Sam Shepherd, Patty Hearst, the Boston Strangler, the My Lai Massacre commander and O.J. Simpson, died Thursday in Atlanta. He was 87. Evening network news shows reported his death Thursday, as did The Associated Press, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The...
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Primetimer

F. Lee Bailey dies: Celebrity defense attorney best known for representing O.J. Simpson was 87

Bailey became a nationally famous in the 1960s representing Sam Sheppard, who was found guilty of killing his wife in 1954. Bailey won a precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court reversal of Sheppard's conviction, leading to his acquittal in a retrial. Sheppard's story inspired the TV series and movie The Fugitive. Bailey's fame led to appearances on What's My Line?, The Tonight Show and The Mike Douglas Show during the 1960s. But Bailey is best known for grilling Mark Fuhrman in the O.J. Simpson case in 1995, which Nathan Lane re-created for The People v. O.J. Simpson in 2016. ALSO: Watch F. Lee Bailey's appearance on Late Night with David Letterman's "Lawsuit Day" in 1984.