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Cate Le Bon

Stereogum

Watch Cate Le Bon Cover John Cale At The Andy Warhol Museum

Earlier this year, Welsh avant-gardist Cate Le Bon released a great new album, Pompeii — one of the best of 2022 so far, even. At the beginning of the tour, she started performing a cover of John Cale’s “Big White Cloud,” a track off his 1970 solo debut Vintage Violence, but phased it out in favor of a Bill Nelson cover instead. But last night at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, she appropriately broke out that Cale cover once again and video made its way online for the first time.
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brooklynvegan.com

Pitchfork Festival 2022 Sunday pics: The Roots, Earl Sweatshirt, Cate Le Bon, Injury Reserve, more

The 2022 edition of Pitchfork Festival wrapped up on Sunday (7/17), which was as damp as the rest of the weekend. The weather couldn’t mess with the power lineup, though—Sunday was practically dedicated to current titans of rap, R&B, and more. The final day featured sets from Noname, Earl Sweatshirt, Toro Y Moi, Tirzah, Cate Le Bon, Joshua Abrams’ Natural Information Society (pinch hitting in place of BADBADNOTGOOD, who couldn't make it), Xenia Rubinos, Erika de Casier, Injury Reserve, KAINA, L’Rain, Sofia Kourtesis, and Pink Siifu, and was headlined by The Roots. About their set, Chicago Sun-Times writes:
Picture for Pitchfork Festival 2022 Sunday pics: The Roots, Earl Sweatshirt, Cate Le Bon, Injury Reserve, more
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jankysmooth.com

The (Drama Club) Kids Are Alright: Bright Eyes and Cate Le Bon at the Greek Theatre

In the early 2000s, Connor Oberst tapped into the sadcore, indie rock zeitgeist that would define Bright Eyes and become cornerstone soundtracks for sensitive teens in their most formative years. Twenty years later, these now 30-40 somethings packed the Greek Theatre for Bright Eyes’ first concert in Los Angeles in a decade. With a perfectly curated set list of songs from each era, Bright Eyes delivered exactly what fans hoped they could expect — Dylan-esque lyrics sung in a quivery voice that would take them back to their high school days. What was not expected, at least by myself, was how a show to tour a 2 year old album and some fan-favorite hits really became a night at the theater.
Telegraph

Cate Le Bon, Hackney Empire, review: indie's great eccentric delivers a masterclass in restraint

For the past decade or so, the Welsh musician Cate Le Bon has gradually established herself as one of indie rock’s great idiosyncratic eccentrics. With each album—from the playful abandon of 2016’s Crab Day, to this year’s woozy and wheezing Pompeii — Le Bon has deviated into ever-stranger places, constructing a sound that is all her own; one which increasingly resists categorisation and sensible description. Writing about it feels like dancing about architecture.
Third Coast Review

Review: A Lovely Valentine’s Day Show with Cate Le Bon & Mega Bog

Love was certainly in the air at Thalia Hall on Valentine’s Day. Couples filled the venue and the lovey day was in full effect. The lineup seemed utterly perfect for the day as Cate Le Bon and Mega Bog shared the stage. That assumption was immediately confirmed as the pair made for what would be an incredible show.
kcrw.com

Getting to a place where you can vanish: How Cate Le Bon wrote ‘Pompeii’ during lockdown

Welsh musician and producer Cate Le Bon has been one of indie music’s most experimental and distinctive artists since her debut in 2009. At times, her work has been described and celebrated by critics as absurd and strange. Born and raised in the Welsh countryside, she now lives in Joshua Tree. She wrote and produced her new album, “Pompeii,” during COVID lockdown two years ago in Wales.
Stereogum

Watch Cate Le Bon & Parquet Courts Cover Bill Nelson’s “Do You Dream In Colour” In NYC

Over the last two nights, Cate Le Bon has brought her Pompeii tour to New York City. In case our Album Of The Week review last week didn’t clue you in, we’re big fans of Pompeii over here — and I can tell you from personal experience last night that a lot of it is even better live. Le Bon’s been great live before. But the particular mix of Reward and Pompeii material, and the balance between the band capturing the albums’ qualities and turning it into something just slightly more muscular live, made for a particularly excellent show.
brooklynvegan.com

Cate Le Bon played 2 mesmerizing nights at Bowery Ballroom (pics, setlists, video)

Cate Le Bon released her terrific new album Pompeii on Friday, and started her North American tour for it on Sunday night in Woodstock. After that, she headed to NYC for two sold-out shows at Bowery Ballroom. I caught the first night and pictures from night 2, along with setlists for both, are in this post.
shepherdexpress.com

Pompeii by Cate Le Bon (Indian Summer)

Although Cate Le Bon is geographically from Wales, artistically she’s also from that ethereal realm where Tori Amos and Kate Bush spend time. Dreaming in that realm has combined with isolation in this realm on Le Bon’s sixth solo album, Pompeii. Le Bon largely accompanies herself: composing the...
aquariumdrunkard.com

Cate Le Bon :: The Aquarium Drunkard Interview

The eruption of Vesuvius in 79 A.D. was one of the great disasters of the ancient world, burying the city of Pompeii in a flow of lava and trapping residents in ash, frozen in their final gestures. It made history violently, but also stopped it forever for those affected. Archaeologists recently dug up an ancient cantina on the periphery of the site, where traces of food still remained in the pottery.
Washington Post

On ‘Pompeii,’ Cate Le Bon leans into strange times

The horizon line is always crooked in a Cate Le Bon song, and while her music has been leaning that way for more than a decade now, the Welsh songwriter can’t stop bringing her lopsided worldview into tighter focus, improving the real world along the way. Through commitment and refinement, her weirdo-prim rock songs have come to feel quaint, and meticulous, and capable of impossible things, like little still-life paintings where the fruit keeps rolling off the table.