C. Robert Cargill

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Paul Di Filippo Reviews Day Zero by C. Robert Cargill

Day Zero , C. Robert Cargill (Harper Voyager 978-0062405807, $27.99, 304pp, hc) May 2021. This era seems a Golden Age for fictional examinations of artificial intelligence, plumbing the deeper meaning of robot consciousness and even silicon emotions. With recent novels such as Today I Am Carey, Set My Heart to Five, Barren Cove, and The Hierarchies, along with films like Ex Machina, Zoe, Blade Runner 2049, and Chappie, contemporary science fiction has refined and deepened the Golden Age and Silver Age tropes involving synthetic beings of humanity’s devising.
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CinemaBlend

Doctor Strange 2: Why Scott Derrickson And C. Robert Cargill Left The Marvel Sequel

CinemaBlend participates in affiliate programs with various companies. We may earn a commission when you click on or make purchases via links. When Doctor Strange co-writer/director Scott Derrickson left the project that would eventually become Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, the reasoning he officially gave was “creative differences.” It’s the oldest statement in the book, and it’s gained a reputation as shorthand for rather upsetting disagreements taking place. Co-writer C. Robert Cargill left alongside him at that same time, and not only can he confirm that the circumstances were as plain as they were stated, another project presented itself as an irresistible substitute.
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Books & LiteratureEW.com

C. Robert Cargill pays tribute to a sci-fi hero in robot apocalypse novel Day Zero

Robert Cargill's just-published science fiction novel Day Zero hinges on the relationship between a boy named Ezra and his tiger-resembling "nannybot" Pounce. "It's the eve of the robot revolution," the author and Doctor Strange coscreenwriter, 45., tells EW. "When everything hits the fan, it's up to a nannybot to decide whether he wants to join the revolution or protect the boy he loves."
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Day Zero by C. Robert Cargill

Isaac Asimov once explained that he was inspired to create his famous Robot stories because he didn’t like what he read in the pulps. In those pages, he said, there were basically two types of mechanical beings – “Robot as Menace” and “Robots as Pathos”. His robot stories were a...
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